Alice Cooper – Trash

I will forever relate Alice Cooper’s phenomenal 18th album with my time at WKQZ, “Thee Rock and Roll Tradition” in Midland, Saginaw, Bay City, Michigan. Being on-air talent at a radio station like this was a dream come true for me. It being at a time that Alice Cooper had one of the hugest comeback albums of all time, was just icing on the cake.

I couldn’t believe that I hadn’t been working in radio even a year when I started at WKQZ. I mean, this was a legendary rock radio station in mid-Michigan, and here I was, barely into the game, spinning Alice Cooper’s comeback single, “Poison”. How cool was that? Granted, it was a weekend overnight slot, the least listened to, but it was on a legendary station in my home state. So who cares? I sure didn’t. If I didn’t make it beyond this point in my on-air career, I didn’t care. This is was what I wanted to be apart of; and here I was.

“Trash” is one of the greatest comeback albums ever. It’s one of the best metal albums ever recorded. It is one of the best records ever made by Alice Cooper, a true legend in rock history. It is also one of the best memories I have from my years in radio.

I will always love this album.

The Who – By Numbers

Quadrophenia” was not an easy album for The Who to follow-up in 1973. There was a lot of pressure for a new album and writer’s block was setting in. Some time was bought by releasing the “Odds and Sods” compilation in ’74 and working on the collaborative “Tommy” film and soundtrack in early 1975. But a record of new songs is what Who fans really wanted and it’s what we got when “The Who By Numbers” came out near the end of ’75.

With the strength of the songs on “By Numbers”, it’s surprising The Who was having a hard time coming up with new material for their seventh album. This is easily one of their most solidly consistent albums from start to finish.

Outside of the music, my favorite thing about “By Numbers” is the album cover, designed and drawn by bassist John Entwistle. The sketched caricatures of the band members perfectly captures the essence of each. But to truly appreciate it, you have to complete the dot-to-dot drawing. I always was able to withhold temptation and not draw on mine. But I just got a great idea. After I finish writing this, I’m gonna scan a picture of the album cover, print it out, and complete it “By Numbers”.

Sometimes I love technology.

Creedence Clearwater Revival – Gold

Despite coming from the San Francisco Bay area in California, Creedence Clearwater Revival had a sound rooted in the Delta blues of the deep south. It wasn’t until many years after I had first heard them that I learned they weren’t from Louisiana or Mississippi. I’m sure I wasn’t the only one who made that assumption when they first heard CCR.

Creedence was one of the most successful bands in the late ’60s and early ’70s, but that success came with a price. The band had a bitter split up in 1972 and numerous lawsuits resulted over the rights to the use of their music. At one point, while pursuing a solo career, lead singer and primary songwriter John Fogerty was sued over royalties for performing CCR songs on stage; songs that he himself had written. The rift between the members ran so deep that even when CCR was inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame more than 30 years after the band’s demise, Fogerty refused to take the stage with the other members at the ceremony.

Gold is a great collection of the biggest hit songs by Credence Clearwater Revival. All of the songs on it are timeless staples of classic rock radio. The album cover is also one of the coolest released by any band. Four silhouettes, one representing each band member is die cut and cascade layered, one on top of the other. Behind each silhouette, there is a photo of the band member in the silhouette.

Great album cover. Great band. Great songs. There’s nothing not to like here.

Red Rider – Neruda

Tom Cochrane never believed in following trends. He believed in individuality. That’s a theme that weaves throughout Red Rider’s third album, “Neruda”.

The album’s title was nod to Chilean poet Pablo Neruda, who was exiled from his home country for holding on to his individualistic beliefs. The songs on “Neruda” all revolve around the importance of the individual living in a society geared towards following trends in order to fit in.

Red Rider was one of the best Canadian rock bands in the 1980’s. Their guitarist, singer and songwriter, Tom Cochrane was one of the most gifted songwriters of that decade. His songs always had a lyrical depth that was far beyond most of his peers. The accompanying music was always a perfect blend of guitar and keyboards, not too polished or rough around the edges; never over produced. Like Red Rider’s other albums, the songs on “Neruda” are easy to listen to but could be at the same time aggressive and challenging. They were always well written and intriguing. And perhaps most importantly, they are never ever trendy.

Lucifer’s Friend – Banquet

I can’t believe the difference in sound between Lucifer’s Friend’s 1970 eponymous debut and their fourth album, 1974’s “Banquet”. It’s hard to realize it’s actually the same band. Gone is the metal crunch of the overdriven guitars and Hammond B3 organ that put them in league with Deep Purple, Uriah Heep, and Black Sabbath. Those sounds are replaced here with more rounded guitar tones and a Fender Rhodes electric piano. Oh, and don’t forget the full horn section. All that, along with the free-flowing extended solos, leaves “Banquet” having much more in common with the progressive, jazz-rock fusion sounds of Traffic, early Chicago, Mahavishnu Orchestra, and ELP than it does with any metal band. About the only things consistent between this and Lucifer’s Friend’s debut album is the incredible musicianship and John Lawton’s amazing voice.

Then again Lucifer’s Friend was a band that seemed to strive to sound different on every new album. I think the diversity in their sound from one album to the next is a big reason they had a hard time gaining popular traction outside of their native Germany. Their fans never knew what to expect from them from one album to the next. The thing was, that’s what I admired about them.

The Tragically Hip – Fully Completely

There are two types of people when it comes to The Tragically Hip. Those who love them as one of the most incredible rock bands ever, and those who have never heard of them. That latter group doesn’t know what the ‘F’ they’re missing out on. But you Canadian’s know.

If I had to pick a favorite Tragically Hip album, I suppose it would be “Fully Completely”. Only because, barring the sentimentality behind first hearing them on my honeymoon in Toronto, this was the album where I realized what incredible band The Tragically Hip were.

It was on “Fully, Completely”, that I discovered how wonderful it can be after the honeymoon; when I could strip out the newness and the sentimentality. It was a time when I first analyzed the core and heart and soul before me and realized the awesome aura of honesty, sincerity and passion surrounding me.

Wait a second…was I talking about my wife of almost 30 years or The Tragically Hip’s music.

Oh yeah…both.

I love you Helen.

The Hip are pretty F’ing awesome too.

Emerson Lake and Palmer – Pictures At An Exhibition

Emerson Lake and Palmer’s masterpiece, “Pictures at an Exhibition” was proof that almost anything could go with rock and roll in the early seventies.  Performed live in 1971, the concert album combined arrangements from Russian composer Modest Muskorky’s 1874 classical score with other related songs written by the band. Keith Emerson had seen a traditional performance of Muskorky’s piece many years earlier and became stoked to have Emerson Lake and Palmer record an adaptation of it.  The album hit number 10 on the US charts and went up to number 3 in the UK.

Like many in the US, the first song I ever heard off of “Pictures at an Exhibition” was the encore ELP played that night: “Nutrocker”, a song combining an excerpt from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite with progressive rock virtuosity. It was released as a single in the United States only. I remember my elementary school music teacher playing “Nutrocker” for us in class one day. I was familiar with The Nutcracker Suite and was absolutely enthralled by this variation of its music.

Lynyrd Skynyrd – One More From The Road

Lynyrd Skynyrd didn’t create Southern rock. They didn’t reinvent it. But in the seventies, Lynyrd Skynyrd was one of the select few who defined the genre. When it was released in 1976, “One More for from the Road” became the quintessential live southern rock album.

Prior to the recording of this masterpiece, Skynyrd had added Oakie guitarist Steve Gaines into their fold, solidifying the band’s signature three lead sound. His influence is most noted on the 13 plus minute closing track “Free Bird” where the band’s three guitarists trade off solos in what has become one of the most legendary live performances ever captured on any recording.

“What song is it you wanna hear?”

Ringo Starr – Ringo

When Ringo Starr released his third solo album in 1973, it was the closest any album would ever come to a Beatles reunion. All three of Ringo’s former bandmates share writing credits and perform on the record. True, they never all appear together on one song and there were no Lennon & McCartney penned songs, but hey, Beatles fans would take what they could get.

The album also included a slew of other guest musicians throughout and became Ringo’s inspiration for touring through decades following with his “All Star Band” of constantly rotating members.

“Ringo” remains among the most successful among the solo records from any former Beatle. It sold over three million copies, hit number 7 on the UK, number 2 in the US, and topped the charts in Canada. The album also score three hit singles fo Ringo: “Photograph”, You’re Sixteen”, and “Oh My My”.

Uriah Heep – Demons And Wizards

I might not have ever heard Uriah Heep’s fourth album “Demons and Wizards” had I not had a brain fart and my sister not gotten it all wrong.

If there is one thing that has remained true about me through the decades, it is if you want to give me a gift, you can’t go wrong with music. One year when we were in high school, my sister asked me what I wanted for Christmas. I’m sure she was not at all surprised when I rattled off a list of albums that were on my radar. “Sweet Freedom“, by Uriah Heep was an album I wanted mainly because it had the song “Stealin'” on it (to this day that is my favorite song by the Heep). Well, I had a brain fart at that moment and although I could picture the album cover in my head, I couldn’t remember the name of the album. So I just told my sister “it’s the album with my favorite Uriah Heep song, “Stealin'”

So Christmas rolls around and we’re exchanging presents. As I’m looking at the present my sister hands me, I can tell by its size that it’s obviously an album. As I tear off the wrapping paper, I see hidden inside, an album by Uriah Heep: “Demons and Wizards”. I must have had a dumbfounded look on my face as I was looking at it, because my sister suddenly explained to me “It’s got your favorite song by them on it: “Easy Livin’.” I didn’t have the heart to tell her that she got the wrong album and the wrong song; at least not right away.


Up until that Christmas, “Easy Livin'” was the only song I knew off of “Demons and Wizards”. It was probably my second favorite Heep song. That changed the moment I heard the album open up with “The Wizard”, an amazing song of hope that asks us all to put our differences aside.

Why don’t we listen to the voices in our hearts?
’cause then I know we’d find that we’re not so far apart

The rest of the songs that follow are Uriah Heep at the top of their game. Yeah, “Stealin'” may still be my favorite Uriah Heep song but hands down, “Demons and Wizards” is my favorite Uriah Heep album.

A few days after Christmas that year, I told my sister that she totally bought me the wrong album…and I thanked her for getting it all wrong.