Roger Daltrey – Under A Raging Moon

I imagine that if you have as easily distinguishable a voice as Roger Daltry, fronting a band as successful as The Who, you have to put extra effort into making solo records that sound distinctly different from the songs you sing with your regular bandmates. With the exception of the album’s title track, Roger Daltrey’s sixth solo album, “Under a Raging Moon” sounds nothing like a Who album.

One thing that makes that so surprising is that the opening track, the only single from the album, “After the Fire” was written by The Who’s guitarist, Pete Townshend. One thing that makes it not so surprising is that the song “Under a Raging Moon” is a tribute song to Keith Moon, The Who’s original drummer who died a few years earlier.

As a tribute to his former mate, Daltry made the ultimate nod of respect to Moon in the title song, calling in a who’s who of drummers. The song includes short drum solos from Martin Chambers (Pretenders), Roger Taylor (Queen), Cozy Powell, (The Jeff Beck Group, Black Sabbath, Rainbow), Stewart Copeland (The Police), Zak Starkey (son of Beatles’ drummer Ringo Starr), Carl Palmer (ELP), as well as the drummer for Daltrey’s band on this album, Mark Brzezicki.

While listening and reading the liner notes to “Under a Raging Moon” another thing that impressed me was that Roger Daltrey chose to donate all the royalties from “After the Fire”, the one and only single off this album, to Band Aid, a charity dedicated to famine relief in Ethiopia and other African countries. If you know the song “We Are The World”, then you probably know of Band Aid”.

As a side note, I want to take the time to thank author Steven R. Pawley, for suggesting I add “Under a Raging Moon” to my record collection. It’s definitely a keeper. Now I suggest you check out his books in The McCatty Chronicles: “Alley Girl”, “The Coffee Cabin”, “Searching for Frownie Mae”, “Sinful Bodies” and the soon to be published “Sandcastles in the City”. They are also keepers.

The Mamas And The Papas – If You Can Believe Your Eyes And Ears

The 1960s. Flower-power. The counterculture. The Mamas and he Papas 1966 debut “If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears” captured it all better than any pop album at the time. Bohemian folk rock, Beatlesque R&B, and a touch of soul that could replace the worst case of the Monday Monday doldrums with harmonious California Dreamin’.

This is the second album cover for “If You Can Believe Your Eyes and Ears”. Like this one, the original cover showed the band members all sitting in a bathtub, but instead of a box listing the singles from the album in the lower right corner, it showed the bathroom’s toilet. That cover was banned shortly after the album was released because some people felt showing a toilet on the cover was obscene. Some record stores even refused to carry it. The original cover is such a rarity that today it can often sell for well over $100. I hope to one day run across it at a more reasonable price. Until then, at least I have the music.

The J. Geils Band – Love Stinks

Rock and roll was going through some significant changes going into the 1980s. Many bands that had cut their teeth in the ’70s either couldn’t adapt to the newer sound and fell by the wayside or overcompensated and were labeled as sell-outs by their long time fans. For The J. Geils Band the transition was easy. Their style of r&b party rock didn’t need to change much at all to propel them to the top of their popularity and the top of the record charts without alienating any of their fans.

The conversation within the band may very well have gone something like this:

Peter Wolf: “Seth, we need you to start playing more synthesizers instead of just piano and organ.”

Seth Justman: “Okay.”

I don’t know if that’s the way it all went down, but it could’ve been. That’s really all Geils did for “Love Stinks” to become their second most successful album shortly after it was released. Their next album, “Freeze Frame”, would do even better.

Led Zeppelin – The Song Remais The Same (soundtrack)

In the short time between when I first saw the film “The Song Remains the Same” and bought the double album soundtrack, I didn’t remember the music from the movie well enough to realize all of the differences between the two. Then again, when I first saw the movie, I was probably in a great state of mind for listening to music; not so good for remembering all of it.

I’m not going to go into all the specifics between the music in the film and on the album – you can Google that easily enough – but in a nutshell, there are songs in the movie that didn’t make it to the record and one that’s the other way around. Also some of the same songs on both are not from the same performances. Sure, both the film and soundtrack were recorded in 1976, during three nights of sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden in New York, but Zeppelin liked to make each of their concerts a unique experience for the audience. They always played their songs differently from one night to the next. When I listen to “The Song Remains the Same” today, I cant help but remember all the differences between the songs here and the music in the film. It’s so significant, I don’t know if I even consider this to be the soundtrack to the film; just a great live album.

The Best Of Sam Cooke

Sam Cooke was a pioneer of soul music, bringing it to the forefront of popular music. Once dubbed the King of Soul, without his groundbreaking songs, popular music may never have come to see the rise of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Aretha Franklin (later dubbed the Queen of Soul); all followed in Cooke’s soulful footsteps.

I guess it should be expected that every song on a greatest hits album is great. So I’ll avoid that particular and predictable redundancy to describe Sam Cooke’s 1965 Greatest Hits album. The description I will use instead is timeless.

Unfortunately, the music world lost Sam Cooke much too soon when in 1964, he was shot and killed by the manager of a motel he was staying at. His death was ruled justifiable homicide in self-defense but that ruling was immediately brought into question. The actual circumstances surrounding Sam Cooke’s death has forever been shrouded in controversy. He was only 33 years old.

The Who – Quadrophenia (Soundtrack)

Although the soundtrack to The Who’s 1979 film Quadrophenia tells the same story as their original 1973 rock opera, it is definitely an album that stands apart from its predecessor. The difference doesn’t make either a better or worse record, they’re just distinctly different.

First off, because it has a film telling Jimmy’s story, the soundtrack doesn’t need to tell all the details, so there are fewer Who songs on it. Side four of the album is actually filled with other bands that had songs featured in the movie. James Brown, Booker T and the MG’s, The Ronettes, and others fill side 4.

Another difference is in the songs that appear on both albums. All of them were re-recorded and for the film and this album. The mixes are noticeably different, most of the time bringing the guitars more up front. Again, this doesn’t really make one version better than the other; just different. I really wouldn’t be able to pick a favorite between them.

There are also some several Who songs on the soundtrack that are not on the original double album. On side 3 for example, only the final track, “The Punk and the Godfather”, appears on both albums. Speaking of side 3, I probably should mention that there are a couple other bands playing on it as well, but not really. “Zoot Suit” is credited to The High Numbers, and “High Heel Sneakers” to the band Cross Section, but it’s still The Who performing them. Both are very early songs by The Who. So early in fact, that the members hadn’t fully settled on a final, permanent name for themselves.

I really have a hard time choosing which “Quadrophenia” I like better, the 1973 original or the 1979 soundtrack. Usually, when I listen to one, I end up putting the other on right after in an attempt to settle the debate in my head once and for all. It never is, but I always enjoy trying.

The Who – Quadrophenia

There are four members, four distinct personalities in The Who, just as there are four distinct personalities inside Jimmy, the protagonist in “Quadrophenia”, the second rock opera by The Who. In the story, each band member represents one of Jimmy’s personalities. Each of Jimmy’s personalities is represented by a song and musical theme on the album.

Had an album of this depth been undertaken by any lesser band than The Who, it could have easily been a total flop. The Who made “Quadrophenia” one of their crowning achievements; one of the most ambitious, influential, memorable, and iconic albums of the 1970s.

Although “Quadrophenia” came out in 1973 and included a 44 page booklet with photography depicting scenes from the story, it was strictly a photo-story. There was not a “Quadrophenia” movie; at least not until 1979. The “Quadrophenia” soundtrack album, is similar to, but also distinctly different from the original album.

For the record (pun intended) Jimmy’s four personalities represented by the members of The Who and their main respective songs are:

    • The tough guy looking for a a fight – Roger Daltry – “Helpless Dancer”
    • The hopeless romantic just wanting to share his affection – John Entwistle – “Is It Me?”
    • The out of control, unpredictable crazy guy – Keith Moon – “Bell Boy”
    • The desperate beggar, con-man, and hypocrite – Pete Townshend – “Love Reign O’er Me”

Stray Cats – Built For Speed

In the US, the Stray Cats pretty much single-handedly revitalized the popularity of rockabilly music in the 1980s. As much as anything, the success of that revival was due to the guitar talents of Brian Setzer.

Rockabilly is rock and roll in one of its earliest forms. Combining old-school country music along with rhythm and blues and a lot of attitude, rockabilly first became popular in the early 1950s. Somewhat limited in the core of its scope, other influences quickly merged with rockabilly, morphing away from the earliest style of rock and roll. This left rockabilly regarded as nothing more than an oldies piece of musical nostalgia.

In the late 1970s and early ’80s some bands tried to revitalize rockabilly by infusing a little punk rock attitude into it. None were more successful than Stray Cats. Brian Setzer was the lead guitarist for the Stray Cats and not only did he have the persona to bring attention to the band, his guitar playing demanded you to listen. Setzer could keep pace with, and even outplay any of the hard rock and metal shredders around then…and now. It just wasn’t as noticable because his solos were played on a hollow bodied Gretsch guitar with a semi-twangy tone instead of an overdriven solid body electric. It was that guitar virtuosity helped the Stray Cats stand out and turn rockabilly into something new in the 1980s, making it more than just nostalgic oldies. It also helped their US debut sell over a million copies.

Dick Clark – 20 Years Of Rock N’ Roll

1953 to 1972. If it’s 20 years into the history of rock and roll and you want to chronicle the music year by year on a double album, you better have a recognized rock and roll authority on the cover. Maybe someone like Dick Clark.

From the fifties into the eighties, Dick Clark, a former rock and roll DJ from WFIL in Philadelphia was the host of American Bandstand. In its 37 years on the air, Bandstand helped launch or excel the careers of more rock and roll bands than probably any other single show – over 8 thousand different acts.

I picked this album up at an estate sale not too long ago. Besides being excited about finding this great compilation of early rock and roll, I was really excited find it still had the 24 page yearbook and bonus record still with it. A lot of times, the extras like these get separated from the album. The yearbook was very insightful, talking about significant events of each year and how popular music both affected and was affected by them.

The bonus record is a picture disk that has Dick Clark’s brief recollections of the numerous bands that made their first appearance on one of his shows. It’s a great insight to just how influential Dick Clark and American Bandstand were during the first 20 Years of Rock n’ Roll.

Joe Cocker!

There are singers, and there are interpreters.

Interpreters are a rare breed of singers. Interpreters don’t need to write their own songs, although they do on occasion; they make any song they sing their own. Interpreters can choose a song that you think could never be done by anyone except the band that first wrote, performed, and made it popular, and turn it into something totally original. They make it unforgettably their own.

Joe Cocker is an interpreter.