The Doobie Brothers – Best of the Doobies

When Michael McDonald joined The Doobie Brothers in 1975, after the departure of Tom Johnston, it significantly changed their sound. Their more straight forward R&B infused rock style was replaced by a more soul based rock sound. This was in part because of the difference in Johnston’s and McDonald’s vocal and songwriting styles and in part because McDonald played keyboards. The Doobies hardly ever used keyboards on their first five albums.

The Doobie Brothers never intended to use that name permanently. Based on one of their activities in addition to making music, they adopted it after a friend jokingly suggested it. The band thought it was a stupid name, but could never agree on anything else. When you consider that before recording their first album, they once performed under the name Pud, it’s probably a good thing they stuck with The Doobie Brothers.

Planet P

I’m terrible with remembering names; except when it comes the names of rock bands and their members. I’m not saying I’m the best, but I do seem to be the go-to when my friends have rock and roll who’s who questions. So when I saw Tony Carey was the primary member of Planet P, I knew exactly who he was, and I knew I had to buy this album.

Tony Carey was the keyboardist for Ritchie Blackmore’s Rainbow when he decided to go solo. Actually, he was already recording solo material before he joined rainbow. Carey had written a lot of sci-fi oriented progressive rock music that really didn’t fit the style of Rainbow or Tony’s solo stuff; so “Planet P” was born.

Planet P is considered to be primarily a one-hit-wonder band because of the song “Why Me”, the video to which was played significantly on MTV in the early ’80s.

I don’t know where Tony Carey came up with the name “Planet P”. Really, it seems like an obscure name. Yet amazingly, after the debut Planet P album came out Carey was approached by another band that had rights to that name, and they didn’t want to give it up. So, the album for this record and the band name were promptly changed. Future albums were released under the new band name “Planet P Project”.

Tony Carey released a few more albums under the “Planet P Project” moniker, but none of them fared as well as this space rock classic. I wonder if record buyers just couldn’t remember the right name. I empathize with them.

Alice Cooper – Killer

Killer is arguably Alice Cooper’s best album,  but then again he, or maybe I should say they, have released so many great records, that’s a difficult claim to make. 

So is which is it? Is Alice Cooper the name of a band or a person? The answer is: both. When the band Alice Cooper started out they did a mix of theatrics along with hard rock and created an image for themselves that brought them great success. Part of that image was to create an eclectic persona for the front man of the band. They named that character Alice Cooper, which was also the name they gave the band. But there really was no person named Alice Cooper.

The lead singers real name was Vincent Furnier, and it was mainly his idea to incorporate the theatrics into their live performances. As the band became more popular, the other band members wanted to move away from the stage extravagance and just focus on the music on stage. This eventually drove a creative wedge between the lead singer and contributing songwriter, and the rest of the band.

Vincent decided he would carry on combining stage theatrics with the music using the name Alice Cooper. The rest of the band members weren’t too keen on that idea and threatened to sue him for the use of the name. But Vincent Furnier had an easy solution – he legally changed his name to Alice Cooper – the rest of the band members  could not stop him from using his legal name. So, for the first seven albums Alice Cooper was the name of the band. For everything that came after, starting with “Welcome To My Nightmare”, Alice Cooper was a person.

I have quite a few records  in my collection  and  I’m  pretty particular with keeping them organized so I can find  what I want to listen to. Alice Cooper is one of the rare cases where there are two places in my musical library where their / his albums reside. The only other case I can think of, off the top of my head, is John Cougar when he changed his name to John Cougar Mellencamp and then John Mellencamp. But that’s another story for another day.