Bad Company – Desolation Angels

I picked up “Desolation Angels” when it first came out in 1979. It was the spring of my senior year in high school.

I was always drawn to Bad Company’s hard rock, blues based, soulful style of rock, yet for some reason I had always bought an album by some other artist when I went to Peaches or Harmony House, the two biggest record stores in Detroit at that time. When I first heard the song “Rock and Roll Fantasy” on the radio after school, I knew this was the next record I was going to buy.

I have many fond memories from high school and many that back then I thought I couldn’t forget too soon. As time went on I realized that the bad wasn’t nearly as extreme as I had perceived it to be. It was the good times with my closest friends that mattered. I don’t know why, but I will always associate those good times with “Desolation Angels”.

If I’m feeling down or anxious or even angry, this is one of those albums that can reel me in and make me remember what was important and made a difference in my life back then. The friends I had. The friends I am blessed to still have in my life today. There are more miles in between than there were back then, but we are still always there for each other. Until the end of my memories, they will always be the Desolation Angels that rescued me.

Maybe I’m taking the risk of being too sentimental here, but who cares? Right now, I want to Take the Time to tell them (and they know who they are) that they were, and will always be, part of my Rock and Roll Fantasy.

YOU GUYS ROCK!

Florence And The Machine – High As Hope

Florence Welch has one of the most immediately identifiable voices in popular music today. She is also an incredible songwriter. With its somewhat stripped down production, Florence and the Machine’s latest album, “High as Hope” focuses on both to create what is one of the best new albums released in 2018.

The songs on “High as Hope” revolve thematically around the end of love. That thought is so ingrained throughout the lyrics of the songs here that “The End of Love” was originally considered for the title of the record. That subject may sound like the making of a somber, even downtrodden record, but it’s really not. As the album’s chosen title implies, the overall focus is the hope that comes after the hunger for love is washed away. Even though there is an aire of sadness here and there, the songs on “High as Hope” purvey an upbeat feeling of acceptance, comfort, and self reliance. This is all beautifully delivered with the perfect pairing of the music to the lyrics…and of course, the confidence exhumed by Florence Welch’s wonderfully powerful voice.

John Lennon – Mind Games

After the break up of The Beatles, there was always the big debate among their fans: who was better as a solo artist, John Lennon or Paul McCartney? Although Paul could write exceptionally good pop/rock songs, to me it was always the depth and meaning in John Lennon’s music that made him better.

John Lennon held a firm belief that the right songs could not only change someone’s life but that they could also impact the world. To some, that may seem like an over the top, grandiose sentiment. But not if you consider the legacy of John Lennon and his music.

“Mind Games” is intentionally less politically motivated than Lennon’s two previous solo albums, due in part to the Nixon administration putting Lennon under FBI surveillance and attempting to have him deported from the US because of the political views expressed in his previous albums. Some of his songs had become rally cries against the war in Vietnam.

Eventually, The Watergate scandal would force Nixon to resign from the Presidency and the US court of appeals would rule that Lennon could not be selectively chosen for deportation based on his nonviolent political activism. Lennon eventually became a permanent resident of the US in 1975.

After Lennon’s tragic death in 1980, a 14 year court battle ensued resulting in over 270 pages of FBI documents being declassified and released. They were published in Jon Wiener’s 2000 book “Gimme Some Truth: The John Lennon FBI Files” and for the making of David Leaf’s 2006 documentary “The US vs. John Lennon”.

Carly Simon – Anticipation

The title track to Carly Simon’s second album, “Anticipation”, was written about her longing for the arrival of Cat Stevens, whom Simon was dating in 1971. It’s a beautiful love song…but it also reminds me of ketchup.

About two years after the release of the single and album of the same name, Heinz chose to use “Anticipation” as the theme for a series of television commercials where it alluded to a longing for the arrival of their thick, slow-moving ketchup. Yeah, not quite as romantic as I’m sure Simon originally intended (at least I hope not) but the ads were so successful and aired so often throughout the 1970s that I bet most who grew up in that era still think more of ketchup than love when they hear Carly Simon sing “Anticipation”. But when you disconnect that memory and listen to the song as if Heinz ketchup never existed, it really is a beautiful testament to love and longing. The rest of the songs on the album were equally introspective musings about love and life. Beautiful songs that almost everyone can relate to; something common to all of Carly Simon’s songs. Fortunately, “Anticipation” is the only one that may be forever remembered as an ode to ketchup.

Jim Croce – Photographs and Memories

Jim Croce was one of the most prolific singer songwriters ever. “Photographs and Memories” is a greatest hits package that proves that point. Throughout his career his songs have evoked emotions and painted musical scenes like no other.

He sang mostly his own songs, but was known on occasion to interpret one by other songwriters. When he did, he alway made it his own. Along with the ones he did pen – songs like “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown”, “Operator”, “I’ll Have to Say I Love You in a Song”, and “Time in a Bottle” – I personally can’t imagine “I Got a Name” being performed by anyone except Croce.

Unfortunately, Jim Croce’s life and songs were cut short when he died in a plane crash while on tour in 1973. He was only 30 years old.

Sade – Diamond Life

There’s a reason “Diamond Life” by Sade (pronounced shah-DAY) was one of the best-selling debut albums in the ’80s. It’s musical combination of jazz, soul, and pop made the songs infectious and irresistible. And then there’s Sade Adu’s sultry and seductive voice. This is the perfect album to start off the day or relax to at the end of it.

Born in Nigeria, Helen Folasade Adu eventually moved to England where her creativity and beautifully exotic looks landed her careers in both modeling and fashion design. But it was while singing background vocals for a local band, Pride, that she found music to be her true calling. Changing her performing name to Sade Adu, she convinced three members of Pride to form a band with her. My guess is it didn’t take much convincing.

“Diamond Life” went on to sell over 4 million copies worldwide and topped the charts in numerous European countries. It hit number 2 in the U.K. and number 5 in the U.S. In the following years, Sade released many more successful albums earning them 9 Grammy nominations, taking home four. Their most recent album, “Soldier of Love” was released in 2010. It hit number 4 in the U.K. and topped the U.S charts.

Sonny & Cher – Greatest Hits

I guess I can hold a grudge sometimes. I don’t think I ever forgave Sonny and Cher for getting divorced and never bought a single solo record by Cher, even though I did like many of her songs.

I remember when I first heard that Sonny and Cher were divorcing in 1974. It was somewhat devastating to me. I had grown up with their songs from the time I was very small and regularly watched their TV variety in the early to mid ’70s. I remember that although they made fun of each other on the show, they seemed so in love – Just like my parents did. How could they have been that much in love and just let it fall apart. What if that happened to my parents?

Yeah, I took Sonny and Cher’s breakup kind of personal (and not because Sonny was born in Detroit) and for whatever reasons, I blamed it on Cher. I didn’t want to like the music from Cher’s solo career, even though I did. I think I subconsciously boycotted her records. I always hoped Sonny would have a successful solo career, but that never happened. True, Cher had the better voice, but Sonny had more talent, writing and arranging many of the duo’s hits (even at a young age, I paid attention to those things). He even continued to write hit songs for Cher’s solo career after their divorce.

Eventually, Sony Bono went into politics, becoming a California congressman until he died in a ski accident in the ’80s. At his funeral, Cher did a very emotional eulogy for him and later, made statements that showed she still had a deep devotional love for him, despite both of them remarrying. I guess I finally forgave her after that.

John Lennon – Imagine

John Lennon was a dreamer. But he had a good dream.

“Imagine” has got to be one of the most beautiful and powerful songs ever written. It’s a song about being a dreamer. It’s about having a dream where there is no war, no hatred, no killing. It’s a dream of universal peace. It begs us all, if only for a moment, to imagine a. world like that.

It can be impossible to believe the world as we know it today could ever be without personal possessions, religion, or nations, as Lennon asks us to imagine in the title track of his second solo album. I think he knows as well as any intelligent person (and John Lennon was very intelligent) it’s an impossible dream for mankind to ever achieve. But it’s easy to imagine it. But as he reminds us here, although the world around us can seem uncaring and cruel at times; though there always seems to be some war going on somewhere; though the news seems to present us daily with a barrage of mankind’s cruelty toward his fellow kind, sometimes it’s good to imagine a different world; a world where no contention exists. Though that world may not ever exist for us, for 3 minutes, John Lennon asks us all to just dream it will one day, then imagine if we at least tried to live that dream.

Adele – 25

I heard Adele refer to her second album, “21” as her break-up album and her third, “25” as her make-up album. As poetic as that may sound, I think of “25” more like her come-to-terms album.

While “21” has a definite theme of relationships falling apart and “25” focuses on the aftermath, not all the songs on Adele’s third album reflect on reconciliation; some center on the necessity of moving on without – even though there is still a yearning. The songs here are also about the acceptance of what is and what will never be. In modern music, there is no one who can tap into and convey this emotion better than Adele.

George Harrison – All Things Must Pass

Paul McCartney may have released the most post-Beatles albums following the breakup of the fab four, but he didn’t record the best. George Harrison holds that esteemed honor with “All Things Must Pass”.

Released in 1970, “All Things Must Pass” is an incredible three record set that let Harrison spread his wings as an artist. The last three Beatles albums were a tumultuous time for the band. Through the ’60s, the names John, Paul, George, and Ringo were synonymous with The Beatles, By 1970 it would have been more accurate to refer to them as Lennon, McCartney, Harrison, and Ringo. Three individuals who felt strongly about what should be on the latter Beatles albums and one who just rolled with it. They all contributed songs, but not all made the cut. On the last three Beatles albums, some songs that Harrison felt strongly about were nixed for ones by Lennon and McCartney, getting the ax without much protest (he was after all, “the quiet one”). So when The Beatles dissolved in 1970 Harrison had solo material he was confident about and was ready to record. Writing a few more, he soon had enough for a second album.

Those two records were enough to establish “All Things Must Pass” as the best post-Beatles album, but Harrison added a third record.

Although it is labeled as side 5 and 6, the aptly titled “Apple Jam” stands apart, yet in cohesion with the other two disks. “Apple Jam” is a collection of long improvisational in-studio jams from the “All Things Must Pass” recording sessions. It feels more like a celebratory encore to the rest of the record than a continuation of the rest of the songs. On the first four sides of “All Things Must Pass” George Harrison was finally able to let his voice be heard; he was no longer “the quiet one”. Sides five and six sound like a celebration of that revelation and freedom.