Jim Croce – Photographs and Memories

Jim Croce was one of the most prolific singer songwriters ever. “Photographs and Memories” is a greatest hits package that proves that point. Throughout his career his songs have evoked emotions and painted musical scenes like no other.

He sang mostly his own songs, but was known on occasion to interpret one by other songwriters. When he did, he alway made it his own. Along with the ones he did pen – songs like “Bad, Bad Leroy Brown”, “Operator”, “I’ll Have to Say I Love You in a Song”, and “Time in a Bottle” – I personally can’t imagine “I Got a Name” being performed by anyone except Croce.

Unfortunately, Jim Croce’s life and songs were cut short when he died in a plane crash while on tour in 1973. He was only 30 years old.

Styx – Cornerstone

Although Cornerstone, the ninth studio album by Styx, still held on somewhat to the band’s progressive rock beginnings, the shift to more pop oriented songs was obvious.  The musical landscape was in the US was changing as the 1970s merged into a new decade and Styx’s music was changing with it.  Styx seemed to almost declare the change with Borrowed Time,  which kicks off side two with Dennis DeYoung declaring “Don’t look  now, but here come the ’80s”.

Cornerstone gave Styx their first and only number one hit with Babe.  Shortly after the power-pop balkad came out, it seemed you couldn’t turn the radio for an hour without hearing it.  I have to say, I started to grow sick of the song after a while.  Listening to it now, I can again appreciate the beauty and tenderness of the song, which Dennis DeYoung wrote for his wife.

“Boat on the River” has always been one of my favorite tracks on Cornerstone.  Although it was an overlooked song in the United States, it remains Styx’s biggest hit in Europe.

Carol King – Tapestry

Brisk Sunday mornings are meant for simpler, mellow sounds. No crunching guitars. No heavy blues. No complex, changing rhythms.  No belting out of the lyrics. Just good quality, we’ll crafted songs performed with a great blend of style and emotion. There is no better singer/songwriter in that realm than Carole King. 

Tapestry is her masterpiece.

But don’t take my word for it. In 1972, Tapestry grabbed four Grammys, including Best Album. With more than 25 million copies flying off store shelves, it is one of the best-selling albums of all time. And in 2003, Rolling Stone magazine named it as one of the 500 best albums of all time. 

Not too shabby for your second album, Carole.