Florence And The Machine – High As Hope

Florence Welch has one of the most immediately identifiable voices in popular music today. She is also an incredible songwriter. With its somewhat stripped down production, Florence and the Machine’s latest album, “High as Hope” focuses on both to create what is one of the best new albums released in 2018.

The songs on “High as Hope” revolve thematically around the end of love. That thought is so ingrained throughout the lyrics of the songs here that “The End of Love” was originally considered for the title of the record. That subject may sound like the making of a somber, even downtrodden record, but it’s really not. As the album’s chosen title implies, the overall focus is the hope that comes after the hunger for love is washed away. Even though there is an aire of sadness here and there, the songs on “High as Hope” purvey an upbeat feeling of acceptance, comfort, and self reliance. This is all beautifully delivered with the perfect pairing of the music to the lyrics…and of course, the confidence exhumed by Florence Welch’s wonderfully powerful voice.

Phil Collins – Face Value

I remember when I first heard Phil Collins’s “Face Value” album. I remember thinking what a great album it was, which was disappointing to me. I remember being concerned that it was the end of Genesis, whom I had only recently started to get into, discovering their diverse back-catalog of progressive rock. I remember not wanting to like “Face Value” because it could mean the end of Genesis. But I remember it was impossible for me to not like it.

Genesis had already suffered the loss of Steve Hackett, their incredibly talented guitarist who had left years earlier to pursue a solo career. But Genesis continued on as a quartet. Then, a few years after that, Peter Gabriel, the front man and primary songwriter for Genesis, also left for a solo career. But Genesis continued on as a trio, with Collins taking on lead vocal and drums in the studio and leaving the comfort of sitting behind a drum kit to front the band when playing live (Bill Bruford, and later, Chester Thompson played drums during concerts).

But the first album by Phil Collins wasn’t the end of Genesis. Nor was his second or third. Phil Collins continued on in both his solo career and with Genesis – and that was a great thing.

The versatility Genesis had shown on all their albums was taken to the next level on “Face Value”. On it, Phil Collins incorporated influences of R&B and soul into many of the songs. He even used the horn section from funk masters Earth Wind and Fire on some of the tracks.

And then of course, there’s the moody song about the anguish and anger felt with the betrayal of love. “In The Air Tonight” was a song Collins wrote after his wife left him. Oh lord, what a great song.

Oh lord, what a great album.

The Smithereens – Especially For You

2017 was a sad year for rock and roll. So many legends and so much talent was lost this year. Perhaps more so than any other year.

Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Tom Petty, Chester Bennington (Linkin Park), Gregg Allman, Chris Cornell (Soundgarden, Audioslave), J. Geils, Malcom Young (AC/DC), and most recently, Pat DiNizio from the Smithereens.

The Smithereens were formed by four friends from New Jersey who in 1980, decided to form a rock and roll band. They finally found success in 1986, with their debut album, “Especially For You”. The band had a hit single with the opening track to the album, “Strangers When We Meet”, and another with the opening song to side two, “Behind the Wall of Sleep”. But their biggest hit off the album…their biggest hit ever…was the unforgettable “Blood and Roses”. A song driven by an unforgettable bass line and lyrics about losing out on love because of not being able to express it. The song was an immediate hit on both ’80s alternative and mainstream rock radio stations.

Sadly, 2017 took its latest, and hopefully its last, rock and roll icon, Pat DiNizio, lead singer and guitarist for The Smithereens, on December 12, 2017. He will forever be remembered by so many for the multitude of emotions he brought to our ears.

In memory of Pat, and all the other legends and remarkable talent we lost in 2017, I will let the rhythmic thump/click of this album’s inner track resonate in the room for at least the next 17 minutes in honor of the rhythmic heartbeats of the those whom rock and roll lost in 2017.

‘Twas a sad year, 2017.