The Tragically Hip – Man Machine Poem

After hearing The Tragically Hip’s 13th album, “Man Machine Poem”, many felt the songs were about lead singer and lyricist Gord Downie’s previously announced diagnosis with terminal brain cancer. They are not. Downie wrote all the words for them before receiving the news. Still, it’s easy to understand how the connection could be made.

Like on The Hip’s prior albums, Downie’s lyrics are poetic tapestries that can have many deep interpretations; mortality and the inevitability of death being among them. Gord Downie went beyond being a song lyricist; he was a talented and inspired poet, a humanitarian, and from what I have read, a genuinely nice guy. I had the pleasure of meeting the band members back in 1998 and my impression was that all them were.

Though Gord Downie is no longer with us, his words will forever live on in the songs of The Tragically Hip. From their 30 year of recording together, there remains more than enough unreleased material to fill a posthumous album; so maybe there is just a little more from The Tragically Hip on the horizon. One can only hope.

The Best Of Sam Cooke

Sam Cooke was a pioneer of soul music, bringing it to the forefront of popular music. Once dubbed the King of Soul, without his groundbreaking songs, popular music may never have come to see the rise of Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, and Aretha Franklin (later dubbed the Queen of Soul); all followed in Cooke’s soulful footsteps.

I guess it should be expected that every song on a greatest hits album is great. So I’ll avoid that particular and predictable redundancy to describe Sam Cooke’s 1965 Greatest Hits album. The description I will use instead is timeless.

Unfortunately, the music world lost Sam Cooke much too soon when in 1964, he was shot and killed by the manager of a motel he was staying at. His death was ruled justifiable homicide in self-defense but that ruling was immediately brought into question. The actual circumstances surrounding Sam Cooke’s death has forever been shrouded in controversy. He was only 33 years old.

Bloodrock 2

I remember the first time I heard Bloodrock 2. A friend wanted me to check out a song on side 2 called “D.O.A.” It’s a song that’s a bit morbid in that it’s written from the perspective of a person dying after a plane crash. It’s one of those songs that once you hear it, you never forget it.

A couple of years back, while perusing the aisles of a local used record store, I saw Bloodrock 2 and the memory of that song that I had heard only a few times decades earlier popped back in my head. I couldn’t remember exactly how the song went, but I remembered it, and I wanted to hear it again. I couldn’t even recall anything else about Bloodrock or their music. The only thing I remembered about them was that song that kind of creeped me out. I had to buy the album just so I could give them a listen.

Fortunately Bloodrock 2 did not creep me out. The album is filled with straight forward blues rock songs that have just a slight southern feel reminiscent of Bloodrock’s Texas origins, making “D.O.A.” kind of stand apart from the rest of the songs. That’s a good thing too, because even though D.O.A. is a great song, if the whole album were like it, Bloodrock 2 would be a really morbid and depressing album.

After listening to the song “D.O.A.” again, I wanted to find out what the inspiration for the song was. It turns out that when Bloodrock’s guitarist, Lee Pickins, was 17 he had just been a passenger in a small airplane. After he got out and was watching the plane take off again, he saw it roll over a couple hundred feet in the air and crash to the ground. I imagine that’s one of those things that once you see it, you never forget it.

The Smithereens – Especially For You

2017 was a sad year for rock and roll. So many legends and so much talent was lost this year. Perhaps more so than any other year.

Chuck Berry, Fats Domino, Tom Petty, Chester Bennington (Linkin Park), Gregg Allman, Chris Cornell (Soundgarden, Audioslave), J. Geils, Malcom Young (AC/DC), and most recently, Pat DiNizio from the Smithereens.

The Smithereens were formed by four friends from New Jersey who in 1980, decided to form a rock and roll band. They finally found success in 1986, with their debut album, “Especially For You”. The band had a hit single with the opening track to the album, “Strangers When We Meet”, and another with the opening song to side two, “Behind the Wall of Sleep”. But their biggest hit off the album…their biggest hit ever…was the unforgettable “Blood and Roses”. A song driven by an unforgettable bass line and lyrics about losing out on love because of not being able to express it. The song was an immediate hit on both ’80s alternative and mainstream rock radio stations.

Sadly, 2017 took its latest, and hopefully its last, rock and roll icon, Pat DiNizio, lead singer and guitarist for The Smithereens, on December 12, 2017. He will forever be remembered by so many for the multitude of emotions he brought to our ears.

In memory of Pat, and all the other legends and remarkable talent we lost in 2017, I will let the rhythmic thump/click of this album’s inner track resonate in the room for at least the next 17 minutes in honor of the rhythmic heartbeats of the those whom rock and roll lost in 2017.

‘Twas a sad year, 2017.