Heavy Metal – Soundtrack

Before graphic novels, there was Heavy Metal magazine…and the movie…and yes, the movie’s soundtrack…

I subscribed to Heavy Metal magazine in the early ’80s. It was awesome. Mature oriented, thought-provoking comics. A precursor to the ’90s graphic novel era. That’s what probably best describes it. The movie was a culmination of the most popular storylines from the magazine into continuous cinematic theme. Because of my being a regular reader of the magazine, I followed the storyline fairly seamlessly. For those occasional readers…well, I guess they had to figure it out for themselves. Oh well, their loss.

To me, the syncopation of the storylines was one of the glories of the “Heavy Metal” movie. Who cares if it wasn’t a perfect melding. It was far better than I could have ever imagined; especially given the diversity of the already established sub plots.

But this isn’t about the movie. This is about the music from it. “Heavy Metal” stands as one of the greatest soundtracks of all time. Need proof? How about Sammy Hagar, Black Sabbath, Blue Öyster Cult, Stevie Nicks, Journey, Grand Funk, Nazareth, Cheap Trick…need I go on? Who cares if you saw the movie or not? Just make sure you listen to the music from it.

Steven Wilson – Home Invasion: In Concert At The Royal Albert Hall

Steven Wilson is an amazing artist. I have had the pleasure of seeing him perform live three times. Twice in Detroit with his former band Porcupine Tree and once in Chicago as a solo artist. Listening to “Home Invasion: In Concert at the Royal Albert Hall” and looking through the 32 page book that accompanies the five albums in this box set makes me wish I would have made the trip to Chicago this past May to see him a fourth time. I won’t make that mistake the next time. Although hopefully, Detroit will be on his next US tour itinerary.

“Home Invasion” clocks in at almost three hours and captures Steven Wilson’s final of three performances at the Royal Albert Hall in England in 2018. The set spans the three most impressive phases of Steven Wilson’s illustrious musical career: Porcupine Tree, Blackfield, and of course his solo material. Steven Wilson’s music is in most often described as progressive or post-prog rock. In the middle of this set, Wilson unashamedly points out that some of some of his recent stuff is pop, and that if you can’t admit that you like pop music, your’re just trying to be a music snob. I have to agree. In reality though, Steven Wilson’s music so often spans across and incorporates so many genres that it stands alone in definition.

I have the day off of work today and decided that instead of sleeping in, I would get up at my regular time, do my normal routine, and after walking the dogs, head down to the man-cave with a cup of coffee and listen to “Home Invasion” in its entirety as the storms on the horizon roll in. I can’t think of a better way to spend a rainy Friday morning.

38 Special – Flashback

When I listen to their biggest hits, I don’t know if I’d really call 38 Special’s music purely southern rock, though it often gets thrown into that category because of the band’s relation to Lynyrd Skynyrd. Donnie Van Zant is the younger brother of Skynyrd’s former lead singer, Ronnie (who tragically died in a 1977 plane crash). 38 Special had a more pop leaning hard rock sound than the strong southern roots heard in Lynyrd Skynyrd’s music. That’s even more evident in 38 Special’s later hits like “Hold On Loosely”, “Caught Up In You”, and “Fantasy Girl”.

Flashback is a greatest hits album that comprises 38 Special’s biggest hits and a new songs “Same Old Feeling”. It also has two songs that were not released on any other 38 Special album. Previously “Teacher, Teacher” was originally recorded for the soundtrack of the 1984 film “Teachers”; “Back to Paradise” appeared on the soundtrack for “Revenge of the Nerds II”.

As a bonus, included with the album, is a 7 inch, 4 song EP. All 4 songs were performed at a Houston, Texas concert on Halloween, 1986.

Ray Charles – Genius Live In Concert

I had the extreme pleasure of seeing Ray Charles perform live in 1986. Even though this album was recorded 22 years prior, it perfectly captures the magic I will always remember experiencing that night.

I remember watching Ray dancing in his seat, swaying and stomping his feet as the music he was playing and singing took him over, and as he took over the entire audience. I remember Ray being so taken over at one point, he jumped out of his seat, dancing on the stage to his band’s music. Nobody worried that he was blind; this was too sublime a moment for God to allow anything to go wrong. I remember Ray’s quick wit shutting down a close to the front row heckler with just a few words. No more was to be said; that evening belonged to Ray Charles.

I remember that night, experiencing a “Genius Live in Concert”. There is no other way to describe Ray Charles perform. A “Genius Live in Concert” is exactly what this album captures.

AC/DC – If You Want Blood You’ve Got It

In the late 1970s, when a lot of established hard rock bands were exploring the integration of disco and pop sounds into their music, AC/DC was building a following keeping it basic, playing hard and heavy.

“If You Want Blood” is a live album recorded during the Bon Scott era of the notorious Aussie-Scott band. AC/DC hadn’t really made a name for themselves yet in the US, so the album only charted in Australia and the UK. Today, “If You Want Blood” is ranked by most rock critics as one of the best live albums of all time.

Hey, I’m no rock critic; I’m just a humble record collector. Who am I to argue?

The Allman Brothers Band – At The Fillmore East

Recorded at the Fillmore East, March 12 & 13, 1971 by special arrangement with Bill Graham.

The Allman Brothers are infamous for their live performances. The Fillmore and Fillmore East were notorious venues that staged performances by the who’s who of rock and roll’s golden age. Bill Graham was a legendary concert promoter in the late 1960s through the ’70s. This 1971 epic double live album was a culmination of all three. There is no way it couldn’t have been anything but one of the best live recordings ever pressed to vinyl.

Sadly, The Fillmore venues would close their doors a few months after this album was recorded, ending an era of rock and roll naiveté and purity that, would never be experienced again. After the 1969 Woodstock Festival, rock and roll started to become a lucrative business, and it would never be the same.

“At The Fillmore East” isn’t an album that tried to become infamous, notorious, or legendary. It just was, by its nature. There was no pretense. There was no financial mindset. All it was,
was a desire to capture an infamous band playing in a notorious venue during a legendary performance, and it captured it perfectly – with all the beautiful imperfections and pure naiveté that rock and roll could hope for.

How can anyone not love this album?

So sorry, but I am going to cue up side four now: “Tied to the Whipping Post”, in all of its 22 minute glory. I can’t write during that.

I have to listen. I’m done here.

Emerson Lake and Palmer – Pictures At An Exhibition

Emerson Lake and Palmer’s masterpiece, “Pictures at an Exhibition” was proof that almost anything could go with rock and roll in the early seventies.  Performed live in 1971, the concert album combined arrangements from Russian composer Modest Muskorky’s 1874 classical score with other related songs written by the band. Keith Emerson had seen a traditional performance of Muskorky’s piece many years earlier and became stoked to have Emerson Lake and Palmer record an adaptation of it.  The album hit number 10 on the US charts and went up to number 3 in the UK.

Like many in the US, the first song I ever heard off of “Pictures at an Exhibition” was the encore ELP played that night: “Nutrocker”, a song combining an excerpt from Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker Suite with progressive rock virtuosity. It was released as a single in the United States only. I remember my elementary school music teacher playing “Nutrocker” for us in class one day. I was familiar with The Nutcracker Suite and was absolutely enthralled by this variation of its music.

B. B. King – Live At The Regal

It was on a cold night on November 21, 1964, in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago, when B. B. King recorded one of the most highly regarded blues albums of all time.

There’s a reason B. B. King is a blues legend. To know that reason, all you need to do is listen to “Live at The Regal”. The blues is meant to be more than just listened to; it’s music that needs to be felt. That cold November night at The Regal Theatre, B. B. King felt it and just as importantly, the audience felt it. Then again when I listen to B. B. King’s distinct voice and guitar, the real question I have to ask with “Live at the Regal” on the turntable is “how could you not?”

Lynyrd Skynyrd – One More From The Road

Lynyrd Skynyrd didn’t create Southern rock. They didn’t reinvent it. But in the seventies, Lynyrd Skynyrd was one of the select few who defined the genre. When it was released in 1976, “One More for from the Road” became the quintessential live southern rock album.

Prior to the recording of this masterpiece, Skynyrd had added Oakie guitarist Steve Gaines into their fold, solidifying the band’s signature three lead sound. His influence is most noted on the 13 plus minute closing track “Free Bird” where the band’s three guitarists trade off solos in what has become one of the most legendary live performances ever captured on any recording.

“What song is it you wanna hear?”

Santana

The band Santana, named after latin rock legend Carlos Santana released their debut album in 1969, a couple of weeks after they played an unforgettable set at the original Woodstock music festival. That incredible performance showcased the band’s freeform jam band style that helped this record shoot up to the number four position on the Billboard charts shortly after its release. That despite receiving mostly negative reviews from music critics. Rolling Stone, perhaps the most influential music publication back then, said the album showcased “hollow technique” and had “no real content”. Meh, what do they know? Decades later, in 2003, they would give Santana’s eponymous debut accolades, describing it as “thrilling” and ranking it as the 150th greatest album of all time.

In their early days, Santana was first and foremost, a jam band. Much like freeform jazz musicians are masters of improvisation, Santana focused on playing by feel, never performing a song the same way twice. That’s why even though they were relatively unknown when they took the stage at Woodstock, everyone remembered them long after they triumphantly walked off it. It is that jam band mastery of musical improvisation that shines through on this record; something hard to pull off in the studio…unless you’re really good. And from the very beginning, Carlos Santana and his namesake band proved they were among the best.