B. B. King – Live At The Regal

It was on a cold night on November 21, 1964, in the Bronzeville neighborhood of Chicago, when B. B. King recorded one of the most highly regarded blues albums of all time.

There’s a reason B. B. King is a blues legend. To know that reason, all you need to do is listen to “Live at The Regal”. The blues is meant to be more than just listened to; it’s music that needs to be felt. That cold November night at The Regal Theatre, B. B. King felt it and just as importantly, the audience felt it. Then again when I listen to B. B. King’s distinct voice and guitar, the real question I have to ask with “Live at the Regal” on the turntable is “how could you not?”

Chicago – Greatest Hits

For whatever reason, I don’t have a lot of greatest hits packages in my record collection. I can’t really say why, other than if a band that I like comes out with a greatest hits album, I usually have most of the albums that have those songs on them, so why bother. The band Chicago is the exception to the rule for me. In the mid-seventies, they were one of my favorite bands, but for whatever reason, I never owned any of their albums. So picking this one up was a given.

As should be the claim for any greatest hits album, there is not a bad song on this record. But Chicago IX, as it is often also referred to, goes beyond just a greatest hits album. It is one of the greatest Greatest Hits albums ever. That’s incredible testament to the band, considering they still had a long enough string of hits afterwards, to come out with two more greatest hits albums – one at the beginning of the 80’s and one at the end.

Chicago’s best work, to me at least, was always their material from the late sixties and early seventies. Going into the 80’s they started to use less and less of their horn section that gave them such a unique sound on their earlier albums, with influences of jazz and rhythm and blues. Though earlier songs also played around with unique vocal arrangements and at times, odd time signatures and shifting rhythms. In the 80s, their sound was much mellower and relied more heavily on the keyboards and Peter Cetera vocals. Although that formula garnered them consistently better chart positions than the hits on this album, it also gave them a more generic sound with their later songs.

To me, this collection is the best of their best.