Cactus

So the other day, I found myself at a local music store, perusing the aisles of used records, and there it was! A record I have been looking for for a very long time. I knew that if I bought only one record that day, it had to be that one, the self-titled debut by the 1970 supergroup Cactus. (Of course I still had to buy more than one album. I think it’s impossible for me to buy only one record at a time.)

I had to buy it not because I like it. I have no idea if I like it. I’ve never even heard it. But I have heard of it. And I’ve heard who plays on it: Drummer extraordinaire, Carmine Apice, who took the jazz stylings of Buddy Rich and Gene Kruppa and applied them to hard rock and blues, Bass legend Tim Bogart who had played with Carmen Apice in Vanilla Fudge and with him again along with Jeff Beck in “Bogert, Beck, And Apice”, Rusty Day, vocalist and harmonica player from the “Amboy Dukes”, and Jim McCarty, a totally underrated Detroit Guitar legend who had played with “Mitch Ryder And The Detroit Wheels” and Jazz fusion group “The Buddy Miles Express”. 

Since I first heard him, Jim McCarty was one of my favorite guitarists, partly because he hails from Detroit, but mostly because, well…because he is an awesome guitarist. 

As I sit here listening to this album, now for the second time, I have to say, I am so glad I finally ran across it and decided to buy it. Most of it rocks out hard – balls to the wall kind of stuff, heavy in the blues but with little flourishes of jazz weaving in and out. Not surprising, considering the players.

Personally, side two is my favorite. It starts out with a blues tinged rocker “Let Me Swim”, which opens with licks that sound like they were probably the influence for Edie Van Halen’s opening to “Eruption”. The album closes with “Feels So Good”, a song that ends with a drum solo proving that Carmine Apice can hang with the best of the a time best of drummers.

I am so glad to have finally had a chance to hear this album, which I had heard so much about. I’m even more pleased that I now have a copy of it in my personal collection. But more than anything, I am so happy I decided to peruse the aisles of used records the other day.