Georgia Satellites

In an era that was dominated by synth rock and glam metal the Georgia Satellites were neither. They were a Southern blues rock band. Plain and simple.

On their debut, the Georgia Satellites played it hard and played it loud. They sounded like a raucous bar band that blew the roof off of every dive they played at, because that’s exactly what they were. Their music was about as out of style to what was popular in 1986 as it could get. No polish. No flash. Just good old foot stomping blues rooted rockers. Plain and simple.

The Georgia Satellites released two singles from their debut album. “Keep Your Hands to Yourself” shot up to number two on the Billboard charts, denied the top spot by Bon Jovi’s “Living on a Prayer”. That song is what made people first take notice of this album. Their second single was a cover of Terry Wood’s straight ahead rocker “Battleship Chains”. Although it didn’t do quite as well as its predecessor, it gave record buyers a glimpse of what to expect on the rest of the album. Music that didn’t fit in with what was popular and didn’t care; as a matter of fact, it was proud of it. Plain and simple.

The Georgia Satellites’ debut album went on to sell over a million copies in the US. It did so without any flash or polish or any marketing blitz. It did it by being a great rock and roll record. Pure and simple.

Cheap Trick – Dream Police

Cheap trick pulled out all the stops for “Dream Police”. Their fourth studio album, released in 1979, combined a hard rock edge with slick studio production. The occasional use of a string section, layered arrangements, textured vocals and of course, great rock and roll hooks – often reminiscent of the Beatles – helped it became the most successful studio album of Cheap Trick’s career. Following in the surprise success of “Live at Budokan” didn’t hurt either.

Tom Petersson’s use of an 8 and 12 string bass give many of the songs on “Dream Police” a growling underbelly that adds just the right amount of tarnish to the mostly otherwise polished production. It is the perfect compliment to Bun E. Carlos’ solid drumming and Rick Neilson’s playfully serious guitar work. The variety of songs on “Dream Police” also provide the perfect showcase for Robin Zander’s diverse snarling and crooning vocal styles.

One of the best albums ever by the boys from Rockford, Illinois.

Dire Straits

Every time I listen to Dire Straits’ debut album, I wonder why there weren’t more singles released from it. “Sultans of Swing”, that’s it. Great song. But there are so many other great songs on this album. The album’s opener “Down to the Waterline” with its signature Knopfler guitar licks, would have been a perfect choice. Another one could’ve been “Setting Me Up”, a country tinted song that was later covered in a more rocking style by alternative band Lone Justice. The catchy “Water of Love” would have been another natural choice, or even “Wild West End”.

Maybe it was that the sound of “Dire Straits” debut album totally cut across the grain of what was popular in music when it came out. Maybe the record label was concerned that “Sultan’s of Swing” took a full 5 months after it was released to even be noticed. But when it did, it shot up to the number 4 spot in the US and stayed on Billboard’s Hot 100 for 132 weeks (that’s over two an a half years). The album itself, went on to sell over 4 million copies in Europe and 8 million in the United States. One single was all that was needed for “Dire Straits” to become the tenth best-selling album of 1978. Yeah, I guess that was good enough for the record company.

But still…

Frijid Pink

In the early 1970, Frijid Pink released what is considered by many – yours truly included – to be the quintessential version of “House of the Rising Sun”. The single hit the number 7 spot on the Billboard singles charts and earned Frijid Pink a gold record.

With a sound that perfectly combined the psychedelic blues rock of Cream with the revolutionary grit and noise reminiscent of Detroit, Frijid Pink’s eponymous debut album was a bombastic force to be reckoned with. That may all sound pretty cool…but dig this: that version of HotRS was just throw-away filler. Frijid Pink still had a little studio time left so they just threw it together in the eleventh hour to kill some time. And if that’s not badass enough for you, try this: after the release of their debut album, Frijid Pink headlined a show at Detroit’s Grande Ballroom; their opening act for the show that night was Led Zeppelin.

Sadly, going into the 1970s, being from Detroit was probably Frijid Pink’s biggest hurdle for greater success. While it was true that audiences were hungry for music grounded in American blues back then, record labels were ironically marketing blues-rock being performed by British, not American artists. Because of this, Frijid Pink never gained the noteriety they truly deserved. Except in Detroit – they always were, and always will be, local legends here.

Deservedly so.

INXS – Shabooh Shoobah

“Shabooh Shoobah” was the first album from INXS, at least to everywhere in the world except Australia. For whatever reason, the two previous INXS albums were not released outside of the band’s native land. With those albums being hugely successful there in 1980 and ’81, it was decided to finally unleash their unique brand of alt/new wave synth-pop rock and roll to the rest of the world.

“Shabooh Shoobah” earned INXS a gold record and two international hit singles, including “The One Thing” which broke onto the US top-40 charts. All in all, “Shabooh Shoobah” gained INXS a loyal following around the globe, setting a strong foundation for the huge success of their next three albums.

Iron Butterfly – In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida

…or should I say “In the Garden of Eden”.

That is what the title song was originally supposed to be called. But when you’re too inebriated, sometimes the words don’t come out right when you try to tell your bandmates the title of the killer new song you wrote. Eastern philosophy and mysticism was hugely popular in 1968, and the drunkenly slurred title sure had that mystic vibe to it, so Iron Butterfly decided to call the song “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” instead.

The song is a 17 minute psychedelic epic based around a heavy blues riff that fills the entire second side of the album. An edited down version, eliminating among other pats, a two and a half minute drum solo in the middle, was release to radio stations in 1968. It became Iron Butterfly’s biggest hit single. The album followed suit, eventually selling over 30 million copies. “In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida” is considered by many to be the very fist heavy metal song.

Foghat

There are blues rock bands and there are blues rock bands…and then there are real blues rock bands like Foghat.

I’ve heard some modern artists today talk about being real. It’s almost become a cliché – sometimes it’s all talk. If you want to listen to a band that walked the walk…if you want to hear a band that was real, listen to any Foghat album.

Foghat was all about American blues rock. They played it hard and true. So true, that when most people first heard them, they didn’t realize they were a British band. As for me…well.. guilty as charged.

It wasn’t until I started digging back into Foghat’s early catalogue that I realized they weren’t an American blues rock band. Actually, it wasn’t until I dug beyond that. After going back to their eponymous debut, I was curious about how Foghat started; where they came from. And then I learned that Foghat was born from the ashes of Savoy Brown.

But wait…Savoy Brown was British…Holy crap! That meant that Foghat had to be…NO F’ING WAY! Foghat was a Brit band?!?! Up until then, I thought these guys were a tried and true American blues based rock band.

Then it dawned on me. That is what Foghat really is – an American blues based rock band. Sure, they came from across the Atlantic, but American blues is where their heart was. It’s what inspired them. It’s what they loved to play. It’s all they ever played. It’s what made them real.

Foghat was the most real American blues rock band ever. They just happened to be British.

Blue Öyster Cult – Agents Of Fortune

I can’t help it. Whenever I listen to “Don’t Fear the Reaper” by Blue Öyster Cult, I can’t help but think of “More Cowbell!” (Thank you SNL).

With its combination of hard rock, prog, and pop, “Agents of Fortune” is an album often overshadowed by what became BÖC’s best known song. But true to nearly all of their albums, “Agents of Fortune” is rock solid from start to finish.

Also, like many albums by BÖC, the band collaborates with New York punk rock poet Patti Smith. Some time earlier, she and the band members had become good friends. Smith cowrote two songs on the record and sings on one them.

One of the things that gave BÖC such a varied sound, especially in their early days, was that all of the original members could sing lead vocals. On “Agents of Fortune” each one does on at least one song. It’s the only BÖC album where that is the case. Maybe that’s why it’s one of my favorite albums by them.

Peaches Records and Tapes – Atlantic Records Sampler

I remember the first time I went inside a Peaches record store in the mid ’70s. If memory serves me, it was at Grosebeck and Masonic in Fraser, MI. I used to think the local Harmony House was big, until my first time walking into that Peaches store. It was HUGE. I thought I was in heaven. If you were looking for an album, they probably had it. If they didn’t, they could get it.

Peaches, which started out in Georgia, was so huge that record labels actually made sampler records for them to play in the store. They were labeled “Not For Sale” but that didn’t mean employees couldn’t take them home after the songs had served their purpose. Inevitably, some of them would, in time, show up in used record stores or today at record collector shows. That’s where I picked this one up recently.

I had to add at least one Peaches in-store sampler to my collection, if for nothing else, the nostalgia. The joy of perusing the aisles of records, listening the latest music playing in the store is something all the dowloaders and streamers today will never understand. They have no idea of the joy they missed out on.

J. D. Blackfoot – The Song of Crazy Horse

The title track to J. D. Blackfoot’s 1973 album “The Song of Crazy Horse”, is an epic 14 minute American history lesson about the life and times of the Lakota (Sioux) American Indian leader, Crazy Horse. It’s a powerful song that speaks of the savage injustice done to the native Americans in the 19th century; how Crazy Horse led his people to fight back, ultimately wiping out the U. S. Army’s 7th Cavalry at Custer’s Last Stand, and wrapping up with Crazy Horse’s arrest and controversial death while in custody of U.S. officials the following year. With a combination of country and psychedelic rock, the song makes a powerful statement to the mistreatment of native Americans in the 19th century; a time in American history that is seldom spoken of.

The remainder of “The Song of Crazy Horse” is not nearly as lyrically intense or musically dispersed as its namesake song. “Ride Away” closes out side one as a folksy epilogue to the epic that preceded it. Side two is filled with blues rooted rockers and ballads with one oddity thrown in. The contrast in the offbeat humor of “Flushed You from the Toilets of My Heart” can’t help but stand out from the rest of this album. It serves as a reminder from J. D. Blackfoot that amongst all this seriousness, he can still have some fun. After that diversion, the album closes out with the somberly beautiful “Comin’ Down”.

“The Song of Crazy Horse” was J. D. Blackfoot’s second album. Hailing from Cleveland, Ohio, he moved to New Zealand before recording this album. Although it was very successful in his adoptive country, it failed to dent the charts in the his country of origin.