Heart

“What About Love” was one of the biggest hits by the band Heart. Along with the other songs on their self-titled album, it marked a significant shift in their sound that was only hinted at on their previous record. This album saw Ann and Nancy Wilson moving from hard rock bordering on progressive rock, to a more mainstream pop sound. A shift they needed to make in order to keep up with the changing music scene.

Music from the ’80s had a very distinct sound. Typically there was heavier use of reverb on the overall sound, most notably on the guitar and drums. In general, there was a heavier use of keyboards and most songs had more of a constant rhytm throughout. Also, every album needed to contain at least one or two slow ballads or love songs. Heart hit that formula perfectly on this album. It became their only album to hit number one on the billboard charts.

Normally, if a band releases a self-titled album it’s their debut. But Heart waited until their eighth. Although it was kind of a debut for them them. It was their first album for Columbia Records who signed them after their contract ran out with Epic. Maybe that’s why they chose to make it eponymous.

The Cult – Electric Peace

The Cult had just had their first major breakthrough with the album, “Love”, and the single from it, “She Sells Sanctuary”, when they went into the studio to record the follow-up to it. For that album, which they had already decided to title “Peace”, they again chose Steve Brown to produce it. Although they were happy with the work he did on “Love”, they were not at all pleased with Brown’s treatment on the new album.

They sought out a new producer for the record and found Rick Rubin. After hearing what they had done so far, Rubin had them go back into the studio and rerecord every song and also record a couple different ones. Because the record produced by Rubin sounded so strikingly different from “Peace”, The Cult decided to rename the new record “Electric”. It may have been a pain for them to go back and redo everything, but it was definitely a good call. “Electric” became The Cult’s most successful album ever.

Although “Peace” is a good record, and would have probably done alright for them, it really didn’t capture what The Cult were truly capable of. On “Electric”, Rick Rubin was able to capture one of the best bands from the ’80s at their very best.

The songs on “Peace” were never released in in their entirety until 2010 when all of songs from it were included with a 2010 limited edition CD. It was finally released in its entirety on vinyl with the originally intended artwork in 2013, included with the album “Electric”. The two album package was called “Electric Peace”.

Billy Squier – Don’t Say No

I remember the first time I heard Billy Squire’s breakthrough album “Don’t Say No”. The song “The Stroke” totally grab me. When I heard it on the radio, I almost immediately went to the PX (that’s post exchange for anyone who hasn’t been in the military – kind of like a department store on a military base) and bought the album. 

I remember thinking when I first listened to it “what band did this guy used to play in?” I was amazed after doing some digging, that he hadn’t really played in any band that had ever made it. I had heard of the band Piper, but never heard anything by them. And seriously, does anyone remember Piper? Maybe I’ll have to try to dig something up by them at a used record store one day, just for the historical record. I like doing stupid stuff like that. 

But I digress.

Billy Squier was an incredibly talented guitarist. And he had some very talented friends who helped springboard his career. When it came time for William Haislip Squier to record his second album, he asked his friend Brian May, from the band Queen, to produce it for him. Unfortunately, Brian was tied up with Queen stuff. 

But… 

Brian May recommended the services of Mack, whom Queen had started working with on their album “The Game”. It was a natural fit. If you listen closely to “Don’t Say No”, it’s easy to hear the influence of Mack and Queen in Billy Squire’s sound. Billy remained friends with the members of Queen throughout his career, and even teamed up with Queen members Freddie Mercury and Roger Taylor on his follow-up albums.

I have to say, I never thought after being a DJ many, many years ago that I would ever be asked to play requests again. But I had a good friend tell me she really wanted me to put Billy Squire’s “Don’t Say No” album on my blog. 

Thank you Jeannette for having me scour the used record stores tring to find this album and to rediscover what a gem of an album it is.

Asia

I remember picking up Asia’s debut, self titled album without ever hearing a song on it. The only thing I knew about the band was who was in it – and that was enough for me. Carl Palmer, the drummer from Emerson Lake and Palmer; Geoffrey Downes and Steve Howe, keyboardist and guitarist respectively from Yes, and John Wetton bassist and vocalist from King Crimson. For members from three of my favorite bands. 

I also remember that when I first heard Asia, I was initially, somewhat disappointed. To me, this was the supergroup to end all supergroups. And in a way it was – just not in the way I expected. This was the ’80s. This was the time of pop and polish – and reverb. Progressive rock was waning in popularity. Gone were the epics that took up an entire side of an album. Gone were the extended solos. The songs on Asia were short and concise compositions – songs designed to be hits. And there were many hits on this album. 

After repeated listenings, I learned to appreciate this album for what it was. The members of Asia, having been in some of the most successful bands in the ’70s, wanted to have a successful album. They also wanted to keep their integrity as musicians and songwriters. Mission accomplished. Asia was the marriage of  ’70s prog and ’80s pop music.

Listening to Asia’s first album now, I realize what a significant record it is. Although it has a somewhat overproduced, distinctly 1980s production style to it, which I am typically not a huge fan of, the musicianship on this album is exceptional. Typical to prog-rock, many of the songs mix loud and soft passages, tempo shifts, and interesting chord chages. Those elements were just more subtle than before, and mixed in with a bit of pop and polish – and reverb. Asia is a great album for what it was: a record that marked a turning point in rock and roll, for better or for worse.

Toto IV (half speed master)

For the most part, I’m not a huge fan of a lot of 80s pop music. I was more into alternative music back then. However, in the case of Toto’s fourth album I make a huge exception. This is an album that is great from start to finish. But then again, considering the musicians on it that’s not too surprising. If you read liner notes and credits on albums the way I do, even before Toto released their first album, Steve Porcaro, Jeff Porcaro, David Paich, and Steve Lukather would have been more than familiar names. Playing as session musicians, they performed on more albums, with more artists, than I have time to mention here. Even after Toto formed, its members continued to make individual appearances on albums by other bands.

It’s not surprising that so many artist would want them to lend their talents. The key members of Toto are perhaps some of the most versatile musicians to ever perform in rock and popular music. That versatility is what really shines on Toto IV. There is nearly something for everyone on this album. Rock, Soul, Funk, progressive rock, Hard Rock, jazz R&B, they’re all present in one manner or the other. It’s that combination that places Toto IV so far beyond nearly any other pop album from the eighties.

Most people probably think that Toto derived the name of the band from the dog in The Wizard of Oz. But according to an early interview with the band members, they actually got their name from the Latin phrase and “in toto”, which means “all encompassing”. The band felt that phrase accurately described the diversity and Incorporation of so many different musical styles in their music.

The Cult – Love

The year was 1985. It was a good year. Not just for me but for music as well. This was the year The Cult broke into notoriety with the release of their second album, “Love”.

I first discovered The Cult on a sampler cassette that came contained in a sealed can. It was called “Survival Sampler: SR-1A Sound Rations”. It looked oddly similar to the many C-rations I had eaten while in the US Army. I had to buy it just because of the packaging. I wore that cassette out. It contained music by The Smiths, The Church, Scritti Politti, The Cure, and of course, The Cult, among others. Because of the song “She Sells Sanctuary”, The Cult was one of the first bands on that cassette that I had to go out and buy an albums by to check out further.

When I first heard “Nirvana”, the opening track on “Love”, with Ian Astbury’s unique vocals and Billy Duffy’s equally stand out guitar tone l knew I knew this was an album that was going to be memorable, if not incredible.  In essence, “Love” is a recording that is hard rock, goth rock, alternative rock, and even the core of classic rock all rolled into one.

“Love” would end up being the album that brought worldwide recognition to The Cult. They would follow it up with their album “Electric” which would go on to be even more successful for them. Both records are on my short list of must have records essential to any vinyl lovers collection.

The Replacements – For Sale: Live At Maxwell’s 1986

I was a fan of The Replacements the first time I heard them. In the ’80s amongst the new wave, alternative, and hair bands, the Matts, as they affectionately became known to their fans, epitomized the attitude of rock and roll.  They weren’t Punk. They weren’t hard rock. They weren’t alternative or indie. They were a refreshing and desperate gasp of breath for a flailing music industry.

“For Sale:…” was recorded over 30 years ago, but just released today. It was intended to be released following the Matts’ major label debut “Tim”, and not too long after they were banned from any NBC television show because they totally trashed the dressing rooms during their appearance on Saturday Night Live and couldn’t refrain themselves from using expletives during their on-air performance. But somewhere along the way the tapes were lost; only recently discovered.

The Replacements were a band that didn’t care about pomp, polish, or any type of flamboyance. They never took the spotlight. They only went on stage on stage to rock their asses off. And if they were too drunk, and f***** it up here and there, so be it. Not giving a s*** was part of the beauty of it.

“For Sale: Live At Maxwell’s 1986” is  live, loose, raucous rock and roll, played without any abandon. If that’s what you’re in the mood for, you will find no better. I am so glad this album was discovered in the Warner Brothers vault, and that they decided to finally release it.

It was well worth the wait.

The Replacements always took a strong stance in doing things their way. In order to sign a major label deal, they had to agree to record at least one music video for a song from it. They had always vehemently opposed recording music videos. So for “Bastards Of Young”, the first single off of “Tim”, the video showed nothing more than someone queuing up the record, sitting down and listening to the song. The only focus was on the speaker playing the music. They were never asked to do another video.

The Call – Modern Romans

In their 15 years together, from 1982 to 1987 The Call released 8 albums. This is the only one I ever owned – actually, it’s the only one I ever even listen to – and I can’t say why. I loved this album when it came out in 1983. I still do today.

“Modern Romans” has a perfect blend of political reverence and musical sensibility and originality. Every song strives to make a statement. And that can be dangerous territory to tread for risk of losing the focus on the quality of the music. I always felt this album hit both marks in perfect balance.

When “Modern Romans came out, the video for “The Walls Came Down” received significant airplay on Mtv (back when Mtv used to play music videos almost exclusively) and the song became The Call’s biggest hit. In it Michael Been sings “I don’t think there are any Russians/And there ain’t no Yanks/Just corporate criminals/Playing with tanks”. Words that some might say are more relevant today than they were when he sang them back in 1983. Whether you agree with the sentiment or not, it’s still good music.