Roger Hodgson – In the Eye of The Storm

When Rodger Hodgson had a fall out with Rick Davis and decided to leave Supertramp and release a solo album, he didn’t fool around. Almost as if he was out to prove who was the main creative Force in Supertramp, he wrote, arranged and produced every song on his debut solo album, “In the Eye of the Storm”. But he didn’t stop there. With only a handful of exceptions Rodger Hodgson please and since every vocal part on this album.

“In the Eye of the Storm” has a sound very reminiscent of Supertramp -progressive rock that is as powerful as it is insightful. It’s primarily keyboard oriented, but that’s not to say it doesn’t have some fine guitar work too. But really, the overall strength of this album lies in the composition and arrangement of the songs on it.

Although Roger Hodgson’s first solo record did have better success than Supertramp’s first album without him, neither he or his former band ever achieved the level of success apart, compared to what they accomplished together. Regardless, I still rank it up there with the best of anything he did with Supertramp.

Robert Plant – Pictures At Eleven

Following the death of Led Zeppelin’s drummer John Bonham, there was some uncertainty about weather the band would continue on with someone different behind the kit. Eventually, the members of Led Zeppelin announced that they couldn’t continue on as they were, and the remaining three members went their separate ways. About a year and a half later, Robert Plant released his debut solo album,Pictures At Eleven. 

Probably in keeping with what was felt fans wanted, the album has a very Zeppelin-esque feel to it, with Robbie Blunts guitar finding a tone very similar to that of Jimmy Page’s. But the album still had moments of Plant moving out of his comfort zone and into new musical territory. There was a heavier use of synthesizers on a couple songs, and a notable difference in the feel of the rhythm section. Phil Collins, the drummer from Genesis, played drums on most of the tracks, delivering a looser R&B back beat than what was typically associated with Led Zeppelin. Cozy Powell, who played on only two songs, had a heavier style of drumming, more akin to John Bonham’s sound. Overall, the album delivered what Zeppelin fans wanted but still gave Plant a chance to forge something new.

In subsequent solo releases, plant would continue to diversify his sound. He also worked on a variety of other non-solo musical projects, including the Honeydrippers and a duet album with bluegrass musician and singer Alison Krauss. 

Throughout his recording career Robert Plant has released over 35 albums, including his work with Led Zeppelin and other other projects. He has a new album coming out this October.