The Kickstand Band – Puppy Love

My sister-in-law is an artist. She teaches sculpture at Wayne State University in Detroit. There are cities in Michigan that have her sculptures on permanent display. She has done exhibitions at art galleries across the United States. I am very proud of her. I am also thankful to her for being responsible for my discovering The Kickstand Band – in a roundabout way.

A little over a year ago, my sister-in-law was doing an exhibit at the opening of the 333 Midland gallery in Highland Park, near Detroit (you should Google it, it is really cool). They had bands playing there. And while I do appreciate visual art, I am by my nature, drawn to music. And there were local bands there. One of the bands was The Kickstand Band. I loved their stage presence and more importantly, their sound. So I went up to meet them afterwards and support them by buying some of their music. I was astonished to find they had their debut album, “Puppy Love”, on CD and vinyl. Of course, I had to buy the vinyl record – it’s always my first choice.

Having just seen The Kickstand Band play live, I already knew their sound. DIY/indie pop and power chords with great boy/girl vocal harmonies. Listening more closely, once I had the record playing at home, I could also hear influences of doo-wop, surf music, punk, and of course, Motown – they are from Detroit after all.

And then there’s the album cover. As if to flaunt the DIY attitude, the cover of “Puppy Love” is a picture that would feel right at home on the Awkard Family Photos website (you should Google that too)

I can’t help but hope The Kickstand Band get a break somewhere down the line. They deserve it. Their music is a joy to listen to. It’s as unique as it is addicting. Not overly abbrasive but still rebellious. I will be keeping eye and ear out for them.

The Clash – London Calling

When The Clash released their third album, “London Calling”, Did they abandon their punk rock roots or open the genre up to greater possibilities?

Punk rock started as a response to the more experimental and extravagant styles that had become commonplace with rock music in the late ’70s. When The Clash and other punk bands arose on the scene, they rebelled with rock music that was raw and stripped down to its very basic core.

Unlike The Clash’s first two albums, “London Calling” was anything but stripped down and basic. The Clash took influences from ska, reggae, R&B, rockabilly, lounge jazz and Celtic music, to create what many consider to be their best album. It surely is one that few will dispute was as groundbreaking as it was influential.

But the question remains: With “London Calling”, did The Clash abandon or expand the definition of punk rock?

It’s been at least a couple decades since I have listened to “London Calling” in its entirety. I had the album a long time ago but got rid of it, along with a lot of other albums I now regret parting with. My intent was to replace my vinyl copy with one on compact disc. The problem was, that never happened. So, this year I asked Santa for it for Christmas, and guess what? Santa came through!

I don’t know what my answer would have been when I first listened to “London Calling” all those years ago. But listening to in its entirety now, for the first time in decades, the answer is perfectly clear and obvious to me.

With “London Calling” did The Clash abandon their punk rock roots or did they expand on the genre?

The answer is “yes.”

The Pretenders

I first discovered The Pretenders around 1983. 

Well, not really. 

I had heard the song “Brass in Pocket” years before. It was all over MTV in 1980. I liked the song, but it didn’t impress me enough to run out and get the eponymous debut album by The Pretenders, but it was memorable enough for me to store it in my gray matter for later reference.

Jump forward three years. I’m in the Army, on temporary duty at Fort McCoy Wisconsin. Most of my fellow soldiers there are into Motley Crue, Poison, Judas Priest, AC/DC and other Hard Rock / metal bands. All those bands had their moments, AC/DC more than the rest, but my personal taste was looking for something different; something more original. On a whim I picked up the debut album by The Pretenders. I didn’t know if I’d like it but I knew I wouldn’t hate it from what I heard from the one song I remembeted. I just knew I wanted something that wasn’t the same old same old. I have to say, that was one of the best spur-of-the-moment choices I ever made musically. 

The Pretenders’ debut album was a lot more punk rock infused than what I had expected – quite a departure from “Brass in Pocket”, but you could still tell it was the same band. There was an attitude; and that attitude was Chrissie Hynde’s vocals. They reminded me of a hip, punk rock version of Karen Carpenter. James Honeyman Scott’s guitar was…absolutely unique is the only description that comes to mind. Simplistically punk, but totally impovisational. Martin Chambers drums varied between Power-punk and reggae rhythms. All of this was glued together by Pete Farndons’ guiding bass-lines that, like in any great rhythm section, adapted perfectly to the drum beats without the slightest hint of reservation or abandonment. 

This was Punk and pop rolled into one, before anyone had ever thought of combining the two extremes. The Pretenders made the combination work, and the formula was followed by many, many bands to follow.

Unfortunately, after The Pretenders second album, Pete Faradon would be kicked out of the band because of problems with his increased drug abuse. James Honeyman Scott would die two days later from a drug overdose. In the aftermath, the Pretenders released an impressive third album, “Learning To Crawl”. But they would never again achieve the chemistry that existed on their first two albums. Absolute punk-pop masterpieces.