Steven Wilson – Transience

Four time Grammy nominee Steven Wilson is one of the most creatively talented recording artists around today. Yet so many people have not really heard of him.  If you happen to fall into that category, the album “Transience” is a great place to start.

Consisting of three sides of music recorded between 2003 and 2015 (the fourth album side is etched with lyrics to one of the songs) “Transience” is a collection of songs taken mostly from Steven Wilson’s previous solo albums. Three of them are reworked exclusively for this album and differ noticeably from their original incarnations. There is also a new re-recording of the song “Lazerus” which was previously recorded by Wilson’s former band Porcupine Tree.

If you haven’t given any of Steven Wilson’s music a listen, you owe it to yourself to do so. He has received praise from critics, numerous other musical artsts, and most importantly, those who have bought his records. He writes and records some of the most adventerous music being produced today. Sometimes intricate and complex, it quite often falls outside of the mainstream, but in no way does that mean his music is extreme or excessive.

The songs on “Transience” are selections that fall more in line with modern contemporary music. This is music that departs from the commonplace and defies being a mere musical backdrop. This is an album that is enticing and unique. It demands to be listened to; not just once but over and over. Because, as with all of Steven Wilson’s albums,  there always seems to be somthing new to hear.

Pink Floyd – A Dark Side Of The Moon Live

This is not an official Pink Floyd album. Some would call it a live concert bootleg. Others would call it an Italian import.

Copyright laws are not the same in every country. Italy in particular, has some of the least restrictive when it comes to live performances. I’ve never looked up all the legal mumbo jumbo, but however their laws are written, there are a lot of unofficial live recordings that come out of Italy on obscure record labels.

Typically, Italian Imports are from a specific concert performance. “A Dark Side Of The Moon Live” is a recording of a Pink Floyd concert at the Wembly Empire Pool in London, England on November 16, 1974. Its a double album on which Floyd performs their incredible 1973 album “Dark Side Of The Moon” in it entirety as well as their epic song “Echoes” from 1972’s “Meddle” as an encore. It is an incredible performance one of the best I have heard actually. But It’s not without its flaws in both performance and recording.

You see, that’s the good and bad of Italian Imports. On the good side, you get a rare recording of a band performing live, with no studio overdubs or post production cleanup. If the band makes a mistake, or there’s tape malfunction, It’s going to be on the record. But you really get the feel of the performance. On “A Dark Side Of The Moon Live”, there is a part of the song “Breathe” that is chopped out with a horrible edit in the very beginning. Other than that, the recording is flawless. And the sound quality is excellent.

Oh yeah, that’s the other thing with Italian Imports. Because they are unofficial, the original source of the recording could be through the mixing board or some dude out in the audience with a microphone. Decades ago, it was hard to know what the quality of an Italian Import record was until you bought it. Today, with the Internet in your pocket, it’s easy to do a little on the spot research to get an idea.

Italian Imports are typically for the hardcore fans of a band. I am a huge Pink Floyd fan, and have a few Italian Imports by them. Some are on CD, and some, like “A Dark Side Of The Moon Live” are on vinyl.

The Crazy World Of Aurthur Brown

If you look up the word “psychedelic” in any dictionary, it should define it as “The Crazy World Of Aurthur Brown”.

Yes, there are many bands that are associated with psychedelic music, but there is only one that defines it: “The Crazy World Of Aurthur Brown”

From the sometimes dark and always twisted lyrics, to the swirling and sometimes explosive music, to the outrageous pyrotechnics and stage antics and makeup that influenced so many bands for decades, including Alice Cooper, Yes, Genesis, George Clinton, Queen, and numerous others. “The Crazy World of Aurthur Brown” helped define psychelelic music and influenced countless bands inside and outside that genre.

It should also be noted that Aurthur Brown had one of the most truly amazing voices in music. His was a rare anomaly that could span four octaves – something he took full advantage of on the band’s self titled debut album.

“The Crazy World of Aurthur Brown” only had one actual hit song, “Fire”, which is on this album, so they are considered to be a “one hit wonder” band. But their true legacy is in the influence they had on so many other bands.

I originally discovered The Crazy World Of Aurthur Brown” when I was looking into where the members of Emerson Lake and Palmer came from. I knew Keith Emerson was formerly in The Nice and Greg Lake had been a member of King Crimson, but I had no idea of where drummer Carl Palmer had started.

I found that answer, and so much more, in “The Crazy World of Aurthur Brown”.

Alabama Shakes – Sound & Color

Sometimes strange is good. “Sound & Color”, the second album from Alabama Shakes, certainly is a strange. It is also excetionally good. Soulful psychedelic blues garage rock is the best way I can find to describe this album. It is one of those I have to be in the right mood to listen to. But when I’m feeling that way, almost nothing else will suffice.

Alabama Shakes formed in 2009 released sound and color in 2015. The album immediately topped the Billboard charts. It was nominated for 6 Grammys, winning four of them, including best alternative album.

Cream – Disraeli Gears

Considered to be the first supergroup, Cream consisted of guitarist Eric Clapton, bassist Jack Bruce, and drummer Ginger Baker. Eric Clapton was well known as one of the best blues guitarists in the ’60s, having formerly played in John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers. Jack Bruce had already made a name for himself playing with Manford Mann and also with Clapton in the Bluesbreakers. Ginger Baker was considered at the time to be the best drummer in rock and roll. He played with an intricate jazz style combined with intense hard rock pounding and was known for extensive drum solos when playing live. He is also noted for being the first drummer in rock and roll to use two bass druns instead of only one.

On their second album, “Disraeli Gears”, Cream held to their formally established blues roots but also ventured into psychedelic territory. The band spent only three and a half days in the studio recording it and it became their breakthrough album in the United States. 

The album title came from an inside joke within the band regarding Eric Clapton wanting to buy a road racing bicycle. Disraeli was a past Prime Minister of England, and one of the band’s roadies referred to the bike as having “Disraeli” gears, when he really meant “derailleur” gears. The band found the snafu so funny, they decided make it their new album title. …I guess you had to be there.

T. Rex – The Slider

T. Rex combined folk rock, psychedelic rock, and glam rock to produce a totally unique sound.  The Slider was released in 1972 to and received both critical and popular praise.  

The front and back cover photographs were taken by Ringo Starr while he was filming a documentary about the band.