The J. Gels Band – Live! Blow Your Face Out!

“Hey Reputah! Reputah the Beautah!

You know you’re really good when you can totally screw up and still make it better than if you had gotten it right.

Case in point: the introduction to the live version of “Musta Got Lost”.

Peter Wolf, the singer to the J. Geils Band, totally forgot the name of the well known storybook character he wanted to use in his introduction to “Musta Got Lost” when recording their live album “Blow Your Face Out”. But instead of being throw off kilter by the screw up, Wolf molded it into one of the most iconic spoken introductions to any song on any record…ever.

Take your big curls and squeeze them down Ratumba –
What’s the name of the chick with the long hair?
(Rapunzel!) Hey Rapunzel!

Hey Reputa! Reputa the Beautah!
Hey Reputa the Beautah, flip me down your hair
And let me climb up to the ladder of your love!!

Although unintended, the screw-up was incredibly appropriate to the song it introduced. “Musta Got Lost” was a song about screwing up. It was a song about letting somebody go and realizing afterwards that it was a mistake. Peter Wolf played on his mistake perfectly, just as anyone needs to do in such a circumstance.

Although he didn’t mean to be so philosophical, in that spoken intro, and the accompanying song afterwards, Wolf embodies the struggle of relationships from the pespective of both heart and mind. He embodies the anger and the pain of it ending, as well as the desire and desperation to want to make it work. The introduction and song embody the realization of how a relationship can be over in one moment…with one screw-up.

If I had any complaint about “Blow Your Face Out”, it’s that it was too sbort – it ended too soon. But then again, the same can be said about any meaningful relationship.

The Honeydrippers – Volume One

It’s a shame there wasn’t ever a Volume Two.

Robert Plant had always had a desire to perform in a uccessful rhythm and blues band. So he dug up his old friends Jimmy Page, whom he had played with in Led Zeppelin, and Jeff Beck, who had played with Page in The Yardbirds. And thus in 1981, with the help of some session musicians, The Honeydrippers were formed.

Featuring Plant singing in his best crooning voice on “Sea of Love”, which hit number three on the Billboard charts, and the more upbeat “Good Rockin at Midnight”, another top 40 hit, the EP was a huge success for The Honeydrippers.

I’m sure I’m not the only one who wonders why there never was the “Volume Two”. Maybe they just felt it was better to leave everybody wanting more.

Heart

“What About Love” was one of the biggest hits by the band Heart. Along with the other songs on their self-titled album, it marked a significant shift in their sound that was only hinted at on their previous record. This album saw Ann and Nancy Wilson moving from hard rock bordering on progressive rock, to a more mainstream pop sound. A shift they needed to make in order to keep up with the changing music scene.

Music from the ’80s had a very distinct sound. Typically there was heavier use of reverb on the overall sound, most notably on the guitar and drums. In general, there was a heavier use of keyboards and most songs had more of a constant rhytm throughout. Also, every album needed to contain at least one or two slow ballads or love songs. Heart hit that formula perfectly on this album. It became their only album to hit number one on the billboard charts.

Normally, if a band releases a self-titled album it’s their debut. But Heart waited until their eighth. Although it was kind of a debut for them them. It was their first album for Columbia Records who signed them after their contract ran out with Epic. Maybe that’s why they chose to make it eponymous.

Eagles – Hotel California

With the addition of Joe Walsh on guitar for, Hotel California, the Eagles took on an edgier, slightly harder sound on some of the songs when compared to their previous records. Most of the album still contained the mellower, “California country” songs that were common on their previous albums, but with “Life in the Fast Lane”, “Victim of Love”, and the song Hotel California” there was a notable shift in the style of their music.

According to the band members, Hotel California a concept album to which the opening title track sets the theme to – loss of Innocence, naivety, ideals sought, and dreams and love lost, are the topics explored within the lyrics.

With the exception of their greatest hits album, Hotel California was the Eagles’ most successful album, and is one of the best selling albums of all time.

The Cult – Electric Peace

The Cult had just had their first major breakthrough with the album, “Love”, and the single from it, “She Sells Sanctuary”, when they went into the studio to record the follow-up to it. For that album, which they had already decided to title “Peace”, they again chose Steve Brown to produce it. Although they were happy with the work he did on “Love”, they were not at all pleased with Brown’s treatment on the new album.

They sought out a new producer for the record and found Rick Rubin. After hearing what they had done so far, Rubin had them go back into the studio and rerecord every song and also record a couple different ones. Because the record produced by Rubin sounded so strikingly different from “Peace”, The Cult decided to rename the new record “Electric”. It may have been a pain for them to go back and redo everything, but it was definitely a good call. “Electric” became The Cult’s most successful album ever.

Although “Peace” is a good record, and would have probably done alright for them, it really didn’t capture what The Cult were truly capable of. On “Electric”, Rick Rubin was able to capture one of the best bands from the ’80s at their very best.

The songs on “Peace” were never released in in their entirety until 2010 when all of songs from it were included with a 2010 limited edition CD. It was finally released in its entirety on vinyl with the originally intended artwork in 2013, included with the album “Electric”. The two album package was called “Electric Peace”.

Pink Floyd – Dark Side Of The Moon

After some long negotiations, I finally convinced my wife to let me not only have a turntable in the man cave, but also upstairs in the living room. As I was getting out of bed, eager to start hooking up the new system, she added one more point to the deal: no playing any Jethro Tull upstairs (for whatever reason, she hates Jethro Tull). I told her that “Aqualung” was the first thing I wanted to play on the new setup. This earned me a bit of an expected scowl in return. 

“I’m joking” I replied, adding “You know what the first thing I always play on any new sound system is.” 

She just said “You’re such a nerd”, rolled over and went back to sleep.

The Cult – Love

The year was 1985. It was a good year. Not just for me but for music as well. This was the year The Cult broke into notoriety with the release of their second album, “Love”.

I first discovered The Cult on a sampler cassette that came contained in a sealed can. It was called “Survival Sampler: SR-1A Sound Rations”. It looked oddly similar to the many C-rations I had eaten while in the US Army. I had to buy it just because of the packaging. I wore that cassette out. It contained music by The Smiths, The Church, Scritti Politti, The Cure, and of course, The Cult, among others. Because of the song “She Sells Sanctuary”, The Cult was one of the first bands on that cassette that I had to go out and buy an albums by to check out further.

When I first heard “Nirvana”, the opening track on “Love”, with Ian Astbury’s unique vocals and Billy Duffy’s equally stand out guitar tone l knew I knew this was an album that was going to be memorable, if not incredible.  In essence, “Love” is a recording that is hard rock, goth rock, alternative rock, and even the core of classic rock all rolled into one.

“Love” would end up being the album that brought worldwide recognition to The Cult. They would follow it up with their album “Electric” which would go on to be even more successful for them. Both records are on my short list of must have records essential to any vinyl lovers collection.

John Leno & Yoko Ono – Double Fantasy

After the breakup of The Beatles, each member of the Fab Four pursued a solo path. Not surprisingly, the often outspoken John Lennon went on to have a very successful post-Beatle musical career. He and his wife, Yoko Ono, also became a much stronger voice in the advocasy for passifiism and anti-war politics.

He took a hiatus from his musical career after his son, Sean was born, deciding to focus more on being a dad rather than a musician. However, after a near tragedy at sea while on a sailing trip, he decided to go back into the studio, only this time it would be together with his wife, Yoko Ono.

The album they made together wasn’t so much a duet, as it was a collection of songs written and performed by each of them. All of the songs focused on  relationships, more specifically,  the ups and downs between John and Yoko. Resembling conversations between the two, the sequence of the songs alternated between one song by John Lennon followed by a song by Yoko Ono. It’s easy to tell, this was a very personal album for both of them.

Although he lived to see the release of his final album Lennon never lived to see the success it achieved. John Lennon was tragically shot outside his New York apartment by Mark David Chapman, on December 8th 1980 and died shortly after. It was one of the saddest days in music history.

Carol King – Tapestry

Brisk Sunday mornings are meant for simpler, mellow sounds. No crunching guitars. No heavy blues. No complex, changing rhythms.  No belting out of the lyrics. Just good quality, we’ll crafted songs performed with a great blend of style and emotion. There is no better singer/songwriter in that realm than Carole King. 

Tapestry is her masterpiece.

But don’t take my word for it. In 1972, Tapestry grabbed four Grammys, including Best Album. With more than 25 million copies flying off store shelves, it is one of the best selling albums of all time. And in 2003, Rolling Stone magazine named it as one of the 500 best albums of all time. 

Not too shabby for your second album, Carole. 

The Tragically Hip – Road Apples

April, 1991. 

My wife and I were on our Honeymoon in Toronto, staying at the Delta Cheslea Hotel downtown. The clock radio was playing a local station as we were getting ready to head out and experience Canada’s biggest city on our first morning there.  Through the tiny speaker next to the bed, a guitar riff grabbed my ear, and I stood motionless, listening to one of the best new songs I had heard in a long time. It was a straight forward R&B tinged rocker, and it kicked! The DJ said it was “Three Pistols,” off “Road Apples,” the new album by local heroes, The Tragically Hip. I made a mental note to check them out further when my new bride and I got back to the U.S.  

When the radio station went into a commercial break, I decided to go out on the balcony and take a look out onto Young Street. As I gazed across the road, glaring back at me was a huge record above a even bigger record store – “Sam The Record Man.” I told my wife of only a couple days then (over 25 years now) that I was going there to get that album by that band before we went back home. She just shook her head, knowing full well that I would. And, on our last day in Toronto, before heading to the train station, that’s what I did.

And that’s how I discovered The Tragically Hip.