Foghat – LIVE

“Ladies and gentlemen, please welcome, FOGHAT!” And so begins one of my all time favorite live albums. My only gripe is – and I ask this every time I listen to this album – “why didn’t they make this a double album?” I guess they wanted to leave you wanting more. And I’m sure Foghat’s performances on the nights the songs on this album were recorded left the audience doing just that.

An offshoot of Savoy Brown, Foghat formed in 1970 and specialized in straightforward blues-based rock and roll.  And they were experts at it and by 1977 had honed and perfected their live performances. Although their preceding studio albums were good, on this album Foghat proved that they were a band that was meant to be heard live. This, their first live album, was their biggest selling record ever.

Foghat “LIVE” featured a die-cut cover with the word “LIVE” displaying the record sleeve behind it which had pictures of the band performing live. Unfortunately, if you didn’t keep this record in a protective sleeve, the “E” would eventually get mangled or torn off when other albums caught on it as they were slid in next to it in your collection. My original copy of Foghat live suffered this fate. It took me forever to find one that wasn’t ripped or torn off. Lesson learned.

Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band – ‘Live’ Bullet

If you grew up anywhere near Detroit in the ’70s, “Live Bullet” by Bob Seger was required listening. At least it seemed that way. Sure, it didn’t sell as much nationally as Peter Frampton’s “Frampton Comes Alive”, but I’d bet my last dollar that in Detroit it trampled it. This album truly was Bob Seger at his best and proved why up to this point he was known as Detroit’s best kept secret.

Of course, as with any exceptional live album, it not just the performer who who makes the night of the concert a magical thing captured on record. The audience is just as significant. And the nights “Live Bullet” was recorded at the legendary Cobo Hall in downtown Detroit, The crowd was feeding every bit as much energy back to the stage as Bob and the Silver Bullet Band were giving to them. “Live Bullet” captured that symbios better than any live album has, before or since.

Near the beginning of the double album, Bob says to the audience that Detroit audiences are the greatest rock and roll audiences in the world. In the 70s, that was definitely true. It’s also true that Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Bands “Live Bullet” is quite possibly the greatest live album in the world.

Although I was not at either of the shows that this album was recorded at, my wife and I had the pleasure of seeing Bob perform a couple decades later at the very last concert in Detroit’s legendary Cobo Hall. Maybe it was only because we were actually in the audience, or maybe it was because I was at the show with the the woman who has been the love of my life for more than 25 years, but that evening felt like it was every bit as magical as the nights this album was recorded. The connection between the audience and Bob was unbelievable proving that that Bob Seger is one of the greatest performers in rock music ever, and that Detroit audiences are still the greatest rock and roll audiences in the world.

J. Geils Band – Full House

One of the best concerts I have ever been to was by the J. Geils Band. Back in the day before sound curfews. Back in the day when a band could play as long as they wanted. Well, almost.

The J. Geils Band was one of those bands that was destined to play live. They made some good records, but where they really shined was on stage. So it’s no surprise that their first really successful album, Full House, was recorded live. This album caught them in all their glory and proved they were one of the most energetic and dynamic bands to see on stage in the ’70s.

Healing from Boston, the Geils always considered Detroit to be a home away from home – and Detroit audiences loved them. So it came as no surprise to me the first time I saw them live, that they were called back on stage for more than one encore. The thing was, even after the encores, the crowd wasn’t leaving the venue. So Geils just kept coming back on stage. I might have lost count, but I know they did at least seven encores that night. The band and the audience finally took the hint that the employees at Pine Knob, a concert venue in Clarkston Michigan, wanted to go home for the evening, when they came on stage and the power was suddenly cut to there instruments after they finished a song. I don’t know if it is true, but I heard rumor that after leaving the concert venue that night they showed up at a local bar in Pontiac Michigan and played untill it closed. I don’t know if that part really happened, but it wouldn’t surprise me.

I’ve met a lot of people who thought the lead singer was the namesake of the J. Geils Band. In reality they were fronted buy an ex-disc jockey from Boston named Peter Wolf. Before recording their very first album, they originally called themselves the J. Geils Blues Band after their lead guitarist, and they only performed instrumentally. They dropped the “Blues” from their name after adding Peter Wolf, their very dynamic lead singer. They signed a record deal shortly thereafter and the rest, as they say, is history.

Heart – Greatest Hits/Live

Don’t let the name fool you. Even though, this 1980 double album by Heart, includes a great collection of their most popular songs from the 1970s along with live concert performances, it also contined three brand new tracks from the Seattle rockers as well as a somewhat obscure non-hit from their fifth album. One of the new songs, “Tell It Like It Is” became a new hit for the band, but the other new tracks were strange non-typical offerings from Ann and Nancy Wilson and crew. 

“Strange Euphoria” was a somewhat lo-fi funk/dance track that sounds like it could have been recorded live in the studio. “Hit Single” was a collage of voices and odd studio outtakes, that I’m not even sure qualifies as a song, altough it is interesting to listen to. It is definitely the most bizarre track Heart ever recorded. 

Side four closes out the album with live covers of hits from other bands including a fierce and thundering version of Led Zeppelin’s “Rock and Roll”. 

European record buyers kind of got ripped off with this record. Heart wasn’t as popular overseas as they were in the United States, so “Greatest Hits/Live” was released there as a single album with their five biggest hits on one side and five live tracks on the other. They didn’t know what they were missing.

Queen – A Night At The Odeon

Christmas eve, 1975. A sold out show at London’s Hammersmith Odeon. One of the first times Queen played Bohemian Rhapsody live. A performance broadcast live on the BBC but never released (except as a bootleg recording) until 2015.

Queen was a band that not only did some incredible stuff in the studio, they knew how to put on one helluva show at their concerts. A Night At The Odeon is Queen captured live and in top form only a few weeks after the release of their fourth album, A Night At The Opera. In that short time, the album had already sold over one million copies, becoming Queen’s first platinum album, and Bohemian Rhapsody had just become the band’s first number one single in the U.K. 

From Brian May’s dual echo guitar extravagance in Brighton Rock to Roger Taylor’s blister pounding drum solo in Keep Yourself Alive. From John Deacon’s distinctly solid bass lines throughout to Freddie Mercury’s unbelievable four octave vocal range, this is Queen holding nothing back to give the audience, in the theatre and across the radio airwaves, a Christmas eve they would never forget.

Yesterday would have been Freddie Mercury’s 71st birthday. Sadly, he lost a long battle with AIDS at the way too young age of 45. 

Happy Birthday Freddie.