Steve Hackett – Please Don’t Touch

“Please Don’t Touch” was the second solo album by Steve Hackett and his first after leaving Genesis.

Although Steve Hackett never achieved the mega-stardom that Genesis did, he has a strong, faithful following among music lovers. He is also regarded as one of the most influential guitarists in rock and roll. His guitar techniques have influenced numerous rock guitarists including Brian May of Queen and Alex Lifeson of Rush. Hackett was using the two-handed tapping technique in his solos years before anyone had heard of Eddie Van Halen. He has released 25 solo albums including 2017’s “The Night Siren”.

25 albums and this is the only one in my collection. There’s something wrong with that. I suppose I should do something about it…

…to be continued…

Laurie Anderson – Mister Heartbreak

Perhaps one of the most unusual artists to gain popular success in the eighties was Laurie Anderson. “Mr. Heartbreak” is her second album. Like its predecessor, “Mister Heartbreak” is a combination of musical experimentation spun together with a combination of spoken word and sung lyrics.

It may take some people a couple listens to fully appreciate “Mister Heartbreak”, or any of Laurie Anderson’s music for that matter. The interplay of the words and sounds is unlike any album that had come before it.

With as different as “Mister Heartbreak” is, I am actually surprised the album did as well as it did, hitting number 60 on the Billboard top 200 album chart in 1984. Certainly, Adrian Belew (King Crimson) on guitar and Peter Gabriel (Genesis) appearing on a couple of songs didn’t hurt it having a broader appeal to some people, making them want to give it a listen. I am glad I was one of them.

Genesis – Three Sides Live

Whenever I listen to “Three Sides Live”, I cant help but wonder why Genesis chose that as the album’s name, since it was only partially relevant.

When it was released in the United States in 1982, “Three Sides Live” seemed a perfectly descriptive name. It was a double album, so there were four sides – three sides were recorded live and one was studio recorded B-sides and songs from an earlier EP.  So…”Three Sides Live”…Yeah, I get it.

The thing is, when Genesis released “Three Sides Live” at the same time in their native England (as well as in the rest of the U.K. and Europe) the five studio songs on side four were replaced by three more live songs, so all four sides on the record were from live performances. I can’t help but wonder if everyone on the other side of the pond went “‘Three Sides Live’…Yeah…I don’t get it.”

I have both versions of “Three Sides Live”, but only the U.S. version on vinyl.  My U.K. version is on CD, which makes the title even more irrelevant since there aren’t even three sides, let alone three sides live. Either way, both versions have some great music on the fourth side.

 

Phil Collins – Face Value

I remember when I first heard Phil Collins’s “Face Value” album. I remember thinking what a great album it was, which was disappointing to me. I remember being concerned that it was the end of Genesis, whom I had only recently started to get into, discovering their diverse back-catalog of progressive rock. I remember not wanting to like “Face Value” because it could mean the end of Genesis. But I remember it was impossible for me to not like it.

Genesis had already suffered the loss of Steve Hackett, their incredibly talented guitarist who had left years earlier to pursue a solo career. But Genesis continued on as a quartet. Then, a few years after that, Peter Gabriel, the front man and primary songwriter for Genesis, also left for a solo career. But Genesis continued on as a trio, with Collins taking on lead vocal and drums in the studio and leaving the comfort of sitting behind a drum kit to front the band when playing live (Bill Bruford, and later, Chester Thompson played drums during concerts).

But the first album by Phil Collins wasn’t the end of Genesis. Nor was his second or third. Phil Collins continued on in both his solo career and with Genesis – and that was a great thing.

The versatility Genesis had shown on all their albums was taken to the next level on “Face Value”. On it, Phil Collins incorporated influences of R&B and soul into many of the songs. He even used the horn section from funk masters Earth Wind and Fire on some of the tracks.

And then of course, there’s the moody song about the anguish and anger felt with the betrayal of love. “In The Air Tonight” was a song Collins wrote after his wife left him. Oh lord, what a great song.

Oh lord, what a great album.

Robert Plant – Pictures At Eleven

Following the death of Led Zeppelin’s drummer John Bonham, there was some uncertainty about whether the band would continue on with someone different behind the kit. Eventually, the members of Led Zeppelin announced that they couldn’t continue on as they were, and the remaining three members went their separate ways. About a year and a half later, Robert Plant released his debut solo album,Pictures At Eleven. 

Probably in keeping with what was felt fans wanted, the album has a very Zeppelin-esque feel to it, with Robbie Blunts guitar finding a tone very similar to that of Jimmy Page’s. But the album still had moments of Plant moving out of his comfort zone and into new musical territory. There was a heavier use of synthesizers on a couple of songs, and a notable difference in the feel of the rhythm section. Phil Collins, the drummer from Genesis, played drums on most of the tracks, delivering a looser R&B back beat than what was typically associated with Led Zeppelin. Cozy Powell, who played on only two songs, had a heavier style of drumming, more akin to John Bonham’s sound. Overall, the album delivered what Zeppelin fans wanted but still gave Plant a chance to forge something new.

In subsequent solo releases, plant would continue to diversify his sound. He also worked on a variety of other non-solo musical projects, including the Honeydrippers and a duet album with bluegrass musician and singer Alison Krauss. 

Throughout his recording career Robert Plant has released over 35 albums, including his work with Led Zeppelin and other projects. He has a new album coming out this October. 

Peter Gabriel – Security

Peter Gabriel’s fourth solo album after leaving Genesis was titled Security in the United States and Canada, but the rest of the world knew it simply is Peter Gabriel’s fourth album. Just like his three previous solo albums the album featured only his name on the cover. Even the spine did not designate any title for the record. Gabriel didn’t want the album to have a name, just like its predecessors. But at the insistence of Geffen Records, who Gabriel had just signed with, he was forced to choose one for its release in the US and Canada. In those countries only, a sticker was placed on the shrink-wrap outside the cover noting the album’s name.

The album was recorded in Gabriel’s home studio where he had amassed a huge collection of then cutting edge synthesizers, drum machines, and full digital recording equipment. For the starting point of all the songs, he recorded rhythms and beats from his travels throughout the world and rather than sampling them, reproduced them on the drum machines and electronic instruments so they could be more easily manipulated. He and the other musicians on the album then improved over those beats and rhythms, structuring the songs. It was a radical approach for its time, but one that’s not very distant from the way many electronic and Hip Hop artists compose their music today.

When listening closely, it’s interesting to hear a simplicity in most of the lead instruments, yet a complexity in the rhythms underlying them as well as in the way the individual pieces are put together to form the whole of the songs.

Shock The Monkey, a song about jealousy, became Peter Gabriel’s first top 40 hit in the United States.