The Best Of The Guess Who

Most Americans will admit without hesitation that our neighbors to the north (or to the south if you live in Detroit) know how to rock. Granted, you recently gave us Justin Bieber, but you also gave us bands like The Guess Who, so we’ll let you slide on your more recent export.

The Guess who were popular in Canada long before America eventually discovered them. Once they broke onto the American music scene in the late 1960s, they seemed to be an unstoppable musical force, due in part to Randy Bachman’s guitar and Burton Cummings unmistakable vocals. Within a few short years, they had amassed enough popularity to easily fill a compilation album of hit songs along with a couple early fan favorites which they released in 1971.

Randy Bachman would eventually leave The Guess Who at the height of their popularity due to creative differences. He would go on to form Bachman-Turner Overdrive, another Canadian band who gained huge success in Canada and the United States.

Arcade Fire – The Suburbs

Sometimes I wonder if I got it all wrong….

Maybe I just wasn’t ready for Arcade Fire  when they first came onto the music scene in 2004. Maybe my expectations were too high after hearing raves about their debut, “Funeral”. To me, it was good…but…meh.  I figured they were a one or two album band destined to mediocrity. I was wrong.

I mostly use word of mouth and the Internet to check out new bands (I’m not a big fan of the  local commercial radio stations today). Thirteen years later, I was still hearing a lot of talk about Arcade Fire. So I went online and listened to them again and found a lot of songs really hit home with me, especially from their 2010 album “The Suburbs”. So much so, that I figured I’d pick up a copy of “The Suburbs” to listen to the album as a whole. It was one of the best musical decisions I have ever made.

Listening to the songs on “The Suburbs” mixed with tracks from other albums, I could tell it was going to be a good album. But the whole is so much better than its parts. This album is a creative masterpiece. The songs are themed around living in the suburbs – the good, the bad, and the mediocre, offering up the lyrics with diverse but uniquely identifiable arrangements.

After listening to “The Suburbs”, I will definitely be giving other Arcade Fire a closer listen. I wouldn’t be surprised if another album from them ends up in my collection. Maybe I should give “Funeral” another listen. Maybe I just wasn’t ready for Arcade Fire’s originality when I first heard it.

Maybe I got it all wrong.

Triumph – Allied Forces

Canadians like to Rock!

When I think of bands from the great white North, the first three bands from the golden age of vinyl that come to mind are Bachman Turner Overdrive, Rush, and Triumph. Maybe it’s having to put out more energy in order to deal with all that snow and the bitter cold up there. I don’t know. But those are three of the hardest rocking bands from the ’70s.

“Allied Forces” is the fifth album by Triumph. It is, in my opinion, the album that best defines the Canadian power trio – and not just because it contains their two most successful songs, “Fight the Good Fight” and “Magic Power”. The songs on this album are collectively everything a good hard rock album should be. They are gritty, powerful, melodic, and lyrically inspiring.

The Tragically Hip – Up To Here

The Tragically Hip are one of Canada’s most successful rock bands – at least in their native country. Although they never achieved the success across the border in the US, except for some bordering cities like Detroit and Buffalo, NY. In Canada, the received numerous accolades including 16 Juno Awards. They’ve also had numerous Gold Records and several number one singles in Canada. They’ve always been one of my favorite Canadian bands. 

One of the only Radio contest I have ever won was to see meet and greet The Tragically Hip at a small recording studio, where they would perform the private concert for 50 winners and a guest as well as tickets to see them at the Palace of Auburn Hills, a large concert venue outside Detroit. I really wanted to be one of the winners in that contest but new my odds of winning were slim to none. But that didn’t stop me from trying. 

One day on my way home from work, the radio DJ announced that caller ten would be one of the winners for the contest just as I was pulling in the driveway. I figured once I got inside, I’d make the call and give it a shot. So I closed my car door, casually walked in the front door, sat my stuff down on the dining room table, picked up the phone and dialed the station. The voice on the other end said “Congratulations! You’re caller 10!”

I was absolutely astonished that I had won. The DJ gave me the details of where the recording studio was and told me I could bring along any one item for them to sign. I had just bought a cheap electric guitar at a garage sale the a few weekends prior, so I knew what I would be carrying into the studio with me, along with a silver Sharpie. That guitar proudly hangs on the wall in my man cave.

I have to say, the guys in The Tragically Hip are some of the most genuinely nicest people I have ever met. There was no rock star arrogance and a real appreciation for their fans. They are one of the few bands I know of that during their 32 years as a band, always had the same members. 

Unfortunately, a few years back Gordon Downie, their lead singer and primary lyricist, was diagnosed with brain cancer and passed away in 2016. A very sad day for Canadian Rock. 

Heart – Dreamboat Annie (half speed master)

One of the finer debut albums by any band, “Dreamboat Annie” spawned three hit singles for Heart: “Magic Man”, “Crazy On You”, and the title track. In addition to those songs, the album contained a wonderful combination of acoustic delicacies, hard rock riffs, and vocal intricacies. The song writing and arrangements on “Dreamboat Annie” are so impressive here that its hard to believe this was a first outing for Heart and not an album by a seasoned rock band.

Heart originally formed in Seattle, Washington but later relocated to Vancouver British Columbia in Canada. “Dreamboat Annie” was originally released in Canada in 1975 on Mushroom Records which had no distribution in the United States. The album sold extremely well in Canada and Mushroom decided to expand into the U.S, releasing “Dreamboat Annie” initially in Heart’s former hometown in 1976. The album did equally impressive there. That success subsequently spread across the U.S. and the success of “Dreamboat Annie” formed a strong foundation for the group’s future popularity.

The success of the “Dreamboat Annie” led to an eventual legal dispute over royalties and a subsequent split between Heart and Mushroom Records. Following the split Heart signed with Epic Records and went on to even greater success, and Mushroom Records went bankrupt. It’s kind of easy to see who got the best end of that deal.